THE PITFALL OF WHOLESALE NETWORKING TO RETAIL PROSPECTS

Business DiscussionThe verb “network” means to meet or interact with people for the purpose of making contacts and exchanging ideas. Contrary to popular belief, its primary goal is not to generate sales! It is, quite simply, to get to know people, and to have them get to know you. Sales are just one of many possible benefits that might result from increased exposure.

I am a strong advocate of networking. I was introduced to several significant vendors and business associates at networking meetings. That includes my insurance agent, social media consultants and two business partners. However, while I have provided leads that resulted in other people closing sales, I can think of only one small client engagement I gained through networking.

Why is that?

It is because my ideal client prospect is unlikely to participate in what I refer to as “retail networking” groups. My best prospects have been established in business for years; are generating annual revenue of several million dollars, have fifty or more employees, are adequately funded and have highly specialized strategic needs beyond their ability to address internally.

Furthermore, they have progressed beyond the usual concerns of new ventures, the greatest of which is simply generating sales. They recognize and value the need for more sophisticated services, and are able to pay to meet those needs.

That profile is not a match to the typical retail networking group. A business targeting start-up operations, solopreneurs, small average sales and/or “main street” business and consumer needs is far more likely to generate sales through networking groups. However, a reality of mining for customers in this environment is high turnover and high marketing costs. Statistics show more than 35% of a typical group’s participants will not be in business in a year, and perhaps as high as 90% within five years.

So if wholesale (or large scale) networking to retail groups is not an alternative for marketing your B2B product or service, what is?

There are probably as many correct answers to that question as there are small businesses. I will share several things that have produced business for me in a future blog.

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Eight Secrets from a Serial Blogger

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Have you been thinking about blogging, but are concerned whether your writing skills will translate into effective online communications?

Increase your chances of success in getting your message to the right audience by avoiding the mistakes of others. This article offers eight simple suggestions its authors learned in the preverbal “school of hard knocks”.

Here they are:

1. Stick to a schedule. The correct blogging frequency is whatever connects with your audience. For some blogs that might be daily. For others, once a month is sufficient. The optimal blogging frequency is not critical. What is critical is to decide on a schedule, communicate it to your readers and stick to it! Avoid the temptation to over-commit. While most bloggers enjoy writing, it can be grueling.

2. Expand and enhance. Supplement your usual content by periodically sharing relevant quotes, articles and tips from others. You can also try using guest writers, treating your readers to different areas of expertise and points of view. A generous introduction to your guest author may result in them reciprocating on their blog, further expanding your following.

3. Keep posts short. Readers are looking for tidbits of actionable information, not detailed research. Keep posts short, preferably under 600 words. The average American reads less than 300 words per minute. Studies suggest 65% of visitors spend less than 2 minutes on a website. Therefore, an entry longer than 600 words will not be read in its entirety, if at all.

  • A better alternative to lengthy articles is to split them into multiple parts, posting them in consecutive entries. Begin each post with a review of what was discussed in the previous entry, and end with what to expect in your next post and when it will be shared.

4. Promote your blog. Add your blog’s web address to business cards, print media ads, letterheads, email signatures and so on. Adding a Quick Response Code to business cards and other medium is gaining popularity. A QR code allows Smartphone users to find your blog easily.

5. Use social media. Post summaries of blog posts on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. Exercise care to comply with each platform’s unique character limitations.

  • Since you will always end with a hyperlink to your blog, use a free URL shortener like https://bitly.com/ if pressed for space.
  • Post blog entries on SlideShare or other article marketing sites by uploading a pdf file. The last paragraph should be a brief “About the author” with a hyperlink to your blog.
  • Blog posts can be featured in your monthly newsletter to customers and friends.

6. Support online sharing. Add plug-ins or widgets on your blog to promote article sharing through Facebook, Twitter and other social media vehicles you believe are likely to help capture your target market. Allow readers to bookmark your URL to their list of favorite sites with the click of a button.

7. Encourage feedback. Always thank readers who post comments. Be respectful of opinions and suggestions, even if you disagree with them. While it is perfectly appropriate to delete spam (an inevitable byproduct of successful blogging) or comments with inappropriate language, deleting reader comments simply because you disagree discourages feedback. Periodically end posts by asking readers for comments, suggestions and ideas for future articles.

8. Don’t give up too quickly. Some experts believe it takes about 100 posts before you begin to build a following. Most bloggers become discouraged and give up before reaching that milestone.

© 2013 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

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