FINDING THE RIGHT DOMAIN NAME

There is an often-told story (disputed by many historians) that the head of the U.S. Patent Office once sent his resignation to President McKinley, suggesting the office be closed because “everything that can be invented has been invented.”

You might think you are encountering a modern day equivalent situation when trying to select a domain name for your business or blog. After all, Google announced seven years ago that it had already indexed over 1 trillion unique URLs.

Securing a good (notice I did not say “the perfect”) domain name can be frustrating. Your selection must be unique, the single road by which the world must travel to your ecommerce doorstep.

It is therefore essential that you secure the best available domain name for your business. Simply recognize and accept in advance that it is usually a classic example of satisfying a process, not optimizing it.

Consider the following points:

  1. Begin by preparing a prioritized list of acceptable names. Avoid unprofessional sounding domain names unless they are somehow related to or descriptive of your business. Variations of your name should be safe bets.
  2. The next step is to search your list on any domain registrar. The largest and best-known registrar in the United States is GoDaddy. Network Solutions and Netfirms are also popular. Prices vary widely. Since you will probably use the same company to host your website and email, consider the entire cost of the package, not just the cost of name registration.
  3. Don’t throw in the towel just because your first choice has been taken. Enter it into your browser and see if it is actually being used. If not, there is an active aftermarket for domain names. Free services such as www.Whois.net and www.Better-Whois.com will show the registrar and, depending on the account’s privacy settings, the name and address of the registrant. You can then contact the owner and inquire whether the name is available at a reasonable price. The same services will tell you when the registration expires and (for a fee) notify you if the registrant fails to renew.
  4. A cheaper alternative is to construct a similar name. Perhaps the insertion of a simple hyphen, using an abbreviation, substituting numeric symbols for words and so on will accomplish your goal. The only limitation is the one imposed by your creativity. Whatever name you choose, try to keep it as short as possible, preferable 10 characters or less.
  5. The most widely used domain extension is .com. If it is unavailable, other options include .net, .biz, .us and .info. Although originally intended for nonprofit organizations, many commercial ventures now use the .org extension. Most registrars will automatically show you other available options if your preferred extension is taken. With the continued expansion of the Internet, the inability to reserve .com no longer carries much of a negative marketing connotation in most situations.
  6. Finally, after you have decided on a domain name and extension, consider reserving other available extensions to keep them out of the hands of current and future competitors. For example, you might buy mycompany.net, mycompany.biz, mycompany.US and mycompany.org as companions to mycompany.com. Additional domain names can be purchased without a hosting package for as little as $10 each, per year. You can also direct inquiries to these companion extensions to your primary web address.

© 2015 by CFO America, LLC

Be Sociable, Share!

Speak Your Mind

*

  • RSS
  • Newsletter
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn