What do Football and Chicken Wings Have in Common?

Today’s title sounds suspiciously like the opening line of a bad joke. Maybe a little later. Actually, it was inspired by last night’s start of the 2011 – 2012 NFL season. Green Bay defeated the Saints in a 42 to 34 nail biter. Therefore, I thought it was appropriate to start today’s blog with a football reference. Here it is!

Did you ever wonder why GMC is the “official truck” of the National Football League? It is not as if they haul injured players off the field on Sierra Hybrids. If they did, can we assume the trucks would be using Castrol, the “official motor oil” of the NFL?

An even bigger question might be why Wingstop is the “official chicken wing” of the Dallas Cowboys. For that matter, do the Cowboys really need an official chicken wing and if so, do they taste better than unofficial wings? I am guessing the nutritional value is about the same. Wingstop is not wondering about those questions. Executive Vice President Andy Howard reported Sunday sales for the 2010 season were up 15 percent in spite of the Cowboys’ disappointing 6 and 10 record.

Endorsement marketing is common in the insurance industry. For example, Hartford Insurance Company teamed up with the AARP to become the endorsed auto and home insurer to the AARP’s reported 40 million members. The AARP also offers life insurance products through New York Life, and long-term care products through Genworth Financial Group.

I am not suggesting you attempt to negotiate a deal with the NFL or a million-member national organization. Start small, on a state or local level. Identify organizations whose members use your products or services. Associations are usually eager to earn income from sources other than their membership. For the cost of an associate membership, an advertisement in their quarterly newsletter or a booth at their annual convention, you can probably find trade associations and similar groups willing to designate your company as the official supplier for your product or service. That in turn provides access to their membership directory, and perhaps speaking engagements.

  • A rule of thumb in the insurance industry is these marketing costs should not exceed two percent of anticipated revenue.
  • The best place to find organizations is your state capital where many will be headquartered.
  • If you are not prepared to market on a statewide basis, find out if there are local or regional chapters.

Do not overlook educational institutions and fraternal organizations as a source of endorsement sales. I knew a small business that was the preferred supplier of screen-printed and embroidered shirts for 50,000 students at Texas A&M University. How much is that endorsement worth? For the 2010 “Maroon Out” football game against Nebraska, one of many annual events the tradition-loving Aggies commemorate with shirts (I have paid for a closet full of them in recent years), the University’s student body, alumni and supporters reportedly bought over 55,000 shirts. My unofficial source tells me the supplier was paid $3.50 apiece.

Again, start small. You are more likely to land a profitable endorsement from a local high school sports team or a Parent-Teacher Association than from a major university. I also knew a one-shop sporting goods store that sold letter jackets for several large high schools. If you have raised a teenager in recent years, you know how expensive these customized items can be.

Let me end with one last football story.

The Seven Dwarfs were marching through the forest one day when they fell in a deep, dark ravine. Snow White, who was following along, peered over the edge and called out to the dwarfs. From the depths of the dark hole a voice returned, “The Cleveland Browns are Super Bowl contenders.” 

Snow White said to herself, “Thank God! At least Dopey survived!”

Would You Like a Beer With That Latté?

Alan Zell, author and retail marketing expert said, “Every business needs more business. That is an accepted fact. The unaccepted fact is that most businesses don’t use all the opportunities available that will bring them additional business. When one looks for additional business, the primary goal should center around getting second sales. What are second sales and why are they important? Second sales are add-on sales, repeat sales and sale by referral. They are important because they are much less expensive to get than first sales.”

I wrote about second sales, or up selling as it is more commonly referred to, last week. Today I will present two more ways to squeeze additional revenue out of your existing customer base. Allow me to begin with an actual example.

If you are a pet owner, you are aware of a powerful strategy veterinary clinics employ to drive sales and increase profits. That strategy is boarding facilities. Think about your experiences boarding pets. Chances are you also have them washed and groomed, and probably address checkups, shots and other recurring medical needs. Of the $65 average daily bill when boarding our Rottweiler, over half is for services other than boarding. I willing pay the $65 because it meets another important need. It buys the added assurance that if anything happens to my 12-year-old dog, she will be well taken care of until I return.

The point is that in addition to being profit centers in their own right, boarding facilities attract customers and generate revenue for other areas of veterinary services.

Ask yourself, “What is an equivalent up selling strategy for my business?” To be successful, it should be either complementary or counter-cyclical to your primary business. Here is an example of each strategy.

Complementary strategy: Starbucks announced a textbook example of a complementary marketing strategy in 2010. They began test marketing beer and wine sales at several Seattle locations. Designed to supplement a product line that holds diminishing customer appeal after the morning rush hour, alcohol goes on sale at 4:00 PM. Starbucks also announced their Starbucks VIA® Ready Brew coffee in 2010. It comes in four flavors, and is available online and through grocery stores and other retail channels. Not surprisingly, it was widely reported in 2011 that Starbucks has replaced Burger King as the nation’s third largest restaurant chain, a major accomplishment for a “non-burger and fries” chain.

Counter-cyclical strategy: Installing holiday lighting is big business in my town. Contractors spend most of November and early December installing lights. They spend January removing, repairing and storing lights for the summer. What do the installers do the rest of the year? I frequently see their trucks around town. I have also met several installers over the years. Everyone had a lawn maintenance or landscaping business that not coincidentally keeps them busy from March through October.

Finally, consider the capital investment (inventory, new equipment, sales training etc.) required for your new products or services, and the payback period expected before the strategy generates a positive cash flow.

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

Too Foolish To Fail – Part 2

On Friday, I began a two-part post on Mark Zuckerberg’s three mistakes in starting Facebook. Mistake # 1 was not coming up with an original idea, but merely improving on other people’s ideas. It turns out that was not a mistake after all.

Today, I will analyze his other mistakes, namely:

2. He waited too long to “cash out.” He should have jumped at the first opportunity to raise some serious “beer money” like a normal college kid. If only he had, he would be a millionaire today!

3. He failed to exercise basic common sense! Anyone smart enough to get into Harvard should know that a dream of launching a worldwide business to redefine a major facet of society is destined to break your heart. Homer Simpson said it best, “Trying is the first step toward failure!”

Let’s analyze these missteps.

I am frequently surprised at the short-term vision baby boomers adopt in their business planning. I often encounter entrepreneurs who hope to build a successful business and “cash out” in five years or less.

This view is a distraction from your value proposition, the very reason you went into business in the first place. Think about it. Customers are at best indifferent to your retirement plans. Would you pick a new dentist if you knew she planned to sell her practice in two years?

It also introduces a bias that will slant business decisions in favor of maximizing short-term cash flows at the expense of building long-term value. For example, owners will forego investments in customer service and product design if payoffs extend beyond their timeline. This situation is analogous to watching a runner round the bases as you chase a fly ball. There are already plenty of opportunities to falter in business without unnecessary distractions. Do not take your eye off the ball!

It seems counterintuitive that a college student, given the opportunity to finance what would have been a carefree life style, would follow a business plan that extended beyond the next frat party. To his credit, now 27-year-old Mark Zuckerberg has resisted the temptation to monetize his 24% stake in Facebook for 7 years. Instead, he has continued to lead the company according to his vision.

It is hard to argue with his success. Earlier this year, Goldman Sachs valued the private company at $50 billion. Mark kept his eye on the ball, even when faced with what would have been an irresistible temptation for us mere mortals. Cashing out four or five years ago would have cost him billions.

You were right, Zuck. My partner and I were….we were….well any way, you were right. Gloating is so not cool, Mark!

That brings me to his third mistake. Mark should have listened to the voices in his head that are quick to point out all the reasons why his grand plans would surely fail.

Abraham Lincoln once described a general who was unwilling to make decisions under pressure as “acting like a duck that had been hit on the head.” Fear of failure is a powerful motivator. It causes some of us to avoid decision making altogether.

Decision making is a cognitive process involving logic, reasoning and problem solving skills. Unfortunately, each of us enters that process with certain preconceived biases. We are often quick to listen to any voice that supports them. It is normal to exhibit a reluctance to move off those biases, even if faced with new facts, circumstances or opportunities. Therefore, the safe decision (i.e., to spend our career as a corporate wage slave rather than launch a new venture) is often the default decision.

Samuel Clemmons once said, “It’s not what you don’t know that will get you in trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”

To his credit, Mark Zuckerberg did not let what he did not know about launching a business get in the way of his success. His vision was inspiring; his execution was courageous.

In the final analysis, my partner and I could take a lesson from him. So can you!

 © 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

SLIDESHARE, HOW DO I LOVE THEE?

I recently discovered SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. It was love at first sight! I wrote an article and a series of blogs (or love letters if you prefer the romance theme) titled Twelve Things I Learned about SlideShare.

SlideShare returned my affections! They featured the article on their home page, quickly gathering over 3,500 views. The article is at http://slidesha.re/kxG4So and on CFO America’s blog beginning at http://bit.ly/jcE8tu.

Like any true romance, my love for SlideShare has only grown stronger since we first met. Therefore, I decided to write a second article on new ways I have learned to use this powerful tool to increase your Internet footprint.

Today, I will share the first three of ten important things you should know about SlideShare. They address SlideShare’s demographics and norms. Wednesday will explain how to embed YouTube videos and how to access SlideShare remotely. Saving the best for last, on Friday I will reveal the secret of the “60 minute Twitter boost.”

Now, let me count the ways (last time, I promise).

  1. SlideShare has over 100 million page views per month. It has 10,000 new uploads every day. They are one of the top 200 websites in the world. According to web traffic monitor Alexa, users offer some attractive demographics. When compared to the general Internet population, 25 to 34 year olds and people with graduate degrees are over-represented. Their users are also disproportionately childless, Hispanic and visit the site while at work. Approximately 63% live in North and South America, 21% in Europe and 14% in Asia.
  2. SlideShare is primarily for PowerPoint presentations and pdf documents. The average presentation is 7.9 megabytes in size. The average document is 1.5 megabytes. With the exception of PowerPoint presentations saved as pdf documents, my files are all 300 kilobytes or less. They uploaded in seconds. While I have shared a 58 megabyte PowerPoint presentation, it took forever. I now save and upload PowerPoint files as pdf documents.
  3. SlideShare reports that the median number of slides is between 10 and 30 per presentation. Over 75% of presentations are 30 slides or less. Only 8% exceed 50 slides. There are some apparent cultural differences in this area. English based presentations average only 19 slides, Spanish 21. The Japanese lead the pack with 42 slides. Presentations average 24 words per slide and 19 images per file. The most popular fonts are Helvetica, Arial and Times New Roman.

Wednesday’s blog will present some actionable tips and suggestions. I look forward to our further discussions. In the meantime, please continue to post your questions and comments.

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

You are Invited to my Party

Small business coach and author Robert Gerrish said, “For many, one of the greatest moments in business is the joy of attracting a new customer or client. In such circumstances, it is easy to get so caught up in the excitement that we forget to spend time on realizing the value of one of our business’s best assets, our existing client base.” For example, you may have heard banks criticized for offering free checking to new customers while charging existing customers for the same service.

As Mr. Gerrish suggests, all too often promotions only target new prospects. Show your appreciation of existing customers by holding promotions and events designed exclusively for them.

  • A special after-hours personal shopping event or trunk show, complete with entertainment, refreshments and “invitation only” discounts is an example. If your products typically require sizing or fitting (such as clothes), allowing a two day presale can create additional excitement. Customers select their purchases in advance, which you hold until the actual sale. This procedure also requires customers to visit your facility at least twice.
  • The luxury day spa I spoke of earlier invited my wife and I (did I mention she is one of their most loyal customers) to an art exhibit by a nationally recognized concert pianist. The event also included a wine tasting.

Another way to demonstrate your appreciation for existing customers, suppliers and employees is to hold an open house or reception. This is a great way to display your operations. It will also strengthen relationships between customers and staff that have not met. If your facilities do not include a suitable physical location, host it at your home, a nearby restaurant or under a tent on the front lawn. Moreover, while your open house or reception must be memorable, it does not have to be expensive. Class is not measured in dollars.

  • You may find network contacts are willing to help cater the event, print programs and menus, provide entertainment or other useful services at substantial discounts in order to promote their products and services to your customer base. Always take full advantage of your network and be ready to reciprocate by supporting and promoting their events.
  • Avoid scheduling functions on weekends or when likely to conflict with numerous holiday events. Use all of the communications tools and options previously discussed to ensure good attendance. There is nothing more discouraging than hosting a party when no one shows up.

A final caution about special event promotions is that in order to be truly special, you cannot hold them too often. Any promotional tool that is used too frequently runs the risk of creating customer expectations that will cause them to avoid full price purchases in anticipation of a sale or event that may never happen.

Next week, I will present an exciting 3-part series on my ongoing love affair with SlideShare.net. It picks up where a June series on this topic left off. I think you will enjoy it. Until then, stay safe and enjoy your weekend. You earned it!

 © 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

Do You Like Me?

Sally Field’s acceptance of the 1984 Oscar for Places in the Heart is a classic among awards ceremony speeches. It included the emotional proclamation, “You like me, right now, you like me!” In a nutshell, all-grownup Gidget was bemoaning that she “didn’t feel the love” when she won her previous Oscar in 1979. Had Ms. Field given that speech today, at least 750 million of us would immediately assume she was somehow referring to her Facebook Fan page.

A Facebook “like” immediately reflects on that person’s page and exposes your product or service to their contacts. Your Facebook fans are essentially providing free advertising and their personal endorsement.

The  simple act of clicking a button also allows fans to post comments on your site unless blocked by your security settings.

Social media experts pay a lot of attention to Facebook likes and the characteristics of typical Facebook fans. For example, studies show that while the average Facebook user has about 130 friends, “likers” average closer to 300. They are 5 times more likely to click on external links. A study by media consultant Syncapse found that Facebook fans spend $71.84 more per year on brands than non-fans. Additionally, they are 28% more likely to continue using that brand.

The net result of all this is that an entire cottage industry has sprung up around helping small businesses increase their Facebook likes. As an internationally recognized champion of low-cost marketing alternatives (a slight exaggeration, but I sure hate spending money unnecessarily), regular readers know how I feel about that!

Therefore, I thought I would share a simple way of generating likes and page views without spending scarce marketing resources. Here it is:

Using your Facebook business account, like popular national or local Fan pages. Then post supportive comments about their product or service. A little light humor will probably attract additional attention. However, avoid posting a blatant advertisement for your Facebook page.

Let me give you a specific example of this tactic in action. This morning I posted, “We’ll be opening our first Diet Cokes long before Dallas thermometers top 100 for the 26th straight day today!” on Coke-Cola’s Fan page.

For a brief period (until pushed off-screen by newer comments), any of Coke’s 32.9 million fans who visited their site saw my innocuous comment, along with CFO America’s logo. Curious viewers could then click the logo to go to http://www.facebook.com/CFOAmerica, exactly where I want them!

You can find a list of the top Facebook Fan pages at http://statistics.allfacebook.com/pages. There are currently 27 sites with over 25 million fans each. There are almost 2,900 pages with 1 million or more fans. Most will allow you to comment on their posts. Some will allow you to post your own comment. Those Fan pages are marketing gold mines!

Over the past month, I have posted similar comments on Fan pages of local amusement parks, restaurants, hotels and so on. Since I began this tactic, new likes have increased 420% and active users (defined as the number of people who have viewed or interacted with my page) 43%. The following graph shows user activity over a two-week period. Notice the activity on July 19, a day when I was especially active in my posting efforts.

As the 17th century proverb said, “The proof of the pudding is in the eating.”

Have a great weekend, and we’ll meet again on Monday.

What to do When Life Hands You Lemmings

Apple introduced the Macintosh personal computer in a third quarter television commercial during Super Bowl XLIII in January 1984. Playing off a George Orwell 1984 theme, it featured rows of uniformed, colorless drones. They sat mesmerized, watching as Big Brother dribbled propaganda on a large movie screen. Suddenly, a female runner chased by storm troopers entered the room. She hurled a sledgehammer against the screen, which explodes. The commercial ended with the statement, “You’ll see why 1984 won’t be like 1984.”

That commercial has been voted the best Super Bowl commercial of all time. Always stick with what works, right?

The following year, Apple decided to use Super Bowl XIX to introduce Macintosh Office. This commercial featured a long line of blindfolded business people marching across a dusty, forbidding terrain. Their only source of guidance is their hand on the shoulder of the person in front of them. One-by-one, they walk off a cliff. It has been dubbed the “Lemmings commercial” and is widely considered the worse commercial in Super Bowl history. Apple did not advertise during the Super Bowl for the next 14 years.

Have you ever had a Lemmings-like marketing experience, one whose cost was exceeded only by its complete failure to accomplish its intended purpose? Sadly, I have! I spent $10,000 developing a traditional website in the hope it would soon have my phone “ringing off the hook” with eager prospects. The vendor guaranteed a “top 3” ranking for the phrase “fractional CFO.” While it accomplished that goal, I am still waiting for the phone to ring! Very few people search that phrase, largely because they do not know what it means.

I gained three things from my personal Lemmings experience. Allow me to now swallow my pride and share the lessons learned.

1. Cut your losses!

Ego has no place in rational business decisions. Admit your mistakes, save what is left of your limited marketing budget and move on! I compounded my mistake by continuing to pay the vendor $60 a month to host the site. They provided no marketing support, no analytical data or anything to justify an additional fee. I eventually moved the site to JustHost.com, a vendor that for a low annual fee provides unlimited email and website hosting. Since I already had an account, I saved $720 per year.

2. Reevaluate your marketing goals and the tactics to achieve them.

My initial hope (it was far too naive to qualify as a goal) was that if I simply created a website, my target market would flock to it and contact me. I now realize it is unlikely businesses will retain executive management consultants solely from online relationships. That is not to say that the website cannot serve a valuable role in my marketing strategy. However, it cannot serve as the primary strategy for new business production. One of my goals is now to move promising online relationships offline. In other words, to make personal connections over a cup of coffee or phone calls. I also learned the need to help educate the business community on the existence, purpose and value of fractional CFOs. My tactics include extensive networking and event-based marketing.

3. Salvage some value from your missteps.

I grew up playing in my family’s auto recycling business (o.k., junkyard if my brother is reading this). I learned the importance of salvaging maximum value from every opportunity. In the case of my misspent marketing funds, I have uploaded the site’s video (half of its cost) to YouTube, where it may increase my Internet footprint and contribute toward my goal of consumer education. As previously mentioned, I also transferred the website to another hosting service. While this may or may not help increase brand awareness and establish my expertise, it is now essentially free!

Let me close with some simple but very practical advice. To err is human. To learn from your mistakes is good business!

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

The Horse Comes Before the Cart, Part 2

This week I am discussing the important topic of determining your marketing strategies within the context of a comprehensive plan. Launching a marketing campaign (even if it does not involve any hard costs) without a plan is “putting the cart before the horse.” On Monday, I presented a framework for constructing your marketing plan. It begins with defining your goals. Today I will share additional thoughts on clarifying your goals and the tactics to accomplish them.

3. Consider financial and non-monetary objectives. Examples of non-monetary objectives include things like closing percentages, page hits and customer traffic patterns. Be specific! A goal of increasing sales is neither constructive nor measurable. A goal of increasing sales 5% per month for the next six months through a combination of a 4% increase in customer count and a $17 increase in average dollars per sale is.

4. Business goals are rarely accomplished in a straight linear fashion. For example, a 24% annual sales increase is not going to come in equal increments of 2% every month. Your marketing strategies are going to take time to produce results. They are affected by existing sales patterns and seasonality that every business experiences. Establish a realistic timeframe for each goal, with appropriate interim benchmarks to measure short-term progress toward long-term goals. That allows you to take timely corrective action or adjust goals as needed.

5. As you define goals and timeframes and the strategies and tactics to accomplish them, be aware of conflicting goals. Here is a simple example. What is the first thing most retailers do when they want to increase revenue? They hold a sale. In other words, they cut prices! Obviously, the hope is that increased customer traffic will more than offset the lower prices. However, it is still a conflict. Here is another example. Assume you want to increase the average customer purchase in your shoe store from $58 to $75. You therefore introduce a new line with a higher price point. Most customers are only going to buy one or two pairs of shoes. Therefore, while revenue from the new line will go up, sales of cheaper lines will probably go down. Conflicts are not necessary bad, and are often unavoidable. My only point is you need to look at the whole picture. Recognize and manage conflicting goals in your market plan.

6. Specify the purpose or desired result of every marketing tactic. In other words, what action do you hope clients or prospects will take because of a marketing initiative? Your definition of purpose establishes the basis of measurement and encourages accountability. The desired result may include multiple objectives, including the following:

  • Business production
  • Generate new leads
  • Brand awareness
  • Introduce a new product or service
  • Advertise a specific sale or promotion
  • Establish your expertise
  • Increase customer traffic
  • Consumer education

7. Tactics rarely operate in a vacuum. You can sometimes leverage one against another. For example, relationships developed online can be taken offline. A social media connection is a far better sales prospect if you subsequently call or meet face-to-face. Similarly, you might precede a direct mail campaign with a subject matter media blitz via article marketing, blogging, email newsletters, press releases and so on.

I will conclude this topic on Friday, when I will discuss step 4 of your market planning process, monitoring costs and results.

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

The Horse Comes Before the Cart

 

 

 

 

 

 

I advocate a simple twelve-word marketing strategy. Communicate one message, promoting one brand, touching multiple audiences at no cost. It is made possible by an abundance of free and low-cost tools that afford simultaneous experimentation in multiple channels. However, successful implementation presupposes you first established a comprehensive marketing plan.

Your marketing plan will be our subject matter for the entire week. Today I will present a planning framework and discuss the importance of goal setting.

Diving into a marketing campaign without first having a plan is analogous to the old phrase “putting the cart before the horse.” You are vulnerable to what Gordon Andrew of Highlander Consulting calls tactical soup. He defines the phrase as “getting bogged down in a flurry of marketing activity without placing enough emphasis on how it will generate revenue and profitability.”

Describing a complete marking plan is beyond the scope of this document. However, I will discuss some basic elements of your plan. Here are a few suggestions to keep in mind.

  1. Constructing a marketing plan is not a “once and done” task. It is a continuous process, as illustrated by the 5-step diagram at the top of today’s article.
  2. The first requirement of a plan is to define your goals, preferably in writing. Let me return to my horse analogy for a moment. Can you image a race where the jockeys did not know where the finish line was? The situation would quickly become chaotic. Horses would run into each other as jockeys individually decided which direction was best. It may sound like a ridiculous example, but it is no different than running a business without a clear direction. Just like a race, knowing where the finish line is and staying focused on it is critical to success. Goals provide us with that direction. As Zig Ziglar says, “A goal, properly set is halfway reached.”

The ultimate purpose of marketing is to influence consumer behavior in ways that accomplish your goals. What exactly do you want to accomplish? A logical place to start defining your goals is by answering a series of questions. They include areas like:

  • How many new clients do you need; how many can you currently accommodate?
  • How will increased sales affect your cost structure? For example, will you need to hire more sales associates or increase inventory levels?
  • What is your target revenue per new client?
  • What is the minimum revenue per client that you can profitably accommodate?
  • How would you describe your target customers in terms of key demographics like age, gender, location, education, income level, professional profile and so on?
  • Who is the ultimate decision maker in target organizations?
  • Where are potential customers likely to turn (Internet, newspaper, Yellow Pages, etc.) to learn about your products or services and to find businesses that provide them?

Finally, today’s picture features my wife Shelley and me standing next to a horse in Central Park. Send me your favorite horse pictures and I will select one for Wednesday and Friday’s blog posts. Email your pictures to support@CFOAmerica.net.

On Wednesday, I will continue this topic with some suggestions to help you establish interim goals and the tactics to accomplish them.

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

Bull Horns in Cyberspace, Part 2

On Wednesday, I began a discussion of things we can do to attract attention to our blogs, and some of the mistakes I have made over the past six months as a blogger. Today I will conclude this topic with Part 2 of Bull Horns in Cyberspace.

Here are my thoughts and suggestions for today:

Find your style. A little trick I have learned that seems to work well is to study a new marketing tool, process, etc., and then write about what I learned. For example, I recently wrote a three-part article called Twelve Things I Learned about SlideShare. I write from the point of view of reporting what I know at the end of the process that I wish I had known at the start. I offer advice to those considering using the same tool, and discuss how to be more effective in communicating their message to an ever-widening audience.

Use other social media to promote your blog. I always post summaries of blog posts on Facebook, Twitter and occasionally LinkedIn. Facebook allows a 420 character article summary, LinkedIn 700. Always leave room for a hyperlink to your blog. Consider using a URL shortener like https://bitly.com/ if you are pressed for space. This is even more important to accommodate Twitter’s 140-character limit. Abbreviated versions of three or four articles are also featured in my monthly newsletter, which is distributed free through MailChimp to over 700 people. Finally, I am having some encouraging preliminary results by posting entire articles on SlideShare.net.

Do not overlook the value of paper in promoting your blog. Add your web address to business cards, print media ads, Yellow Page listings (you remember those, right?), letterheads, email signatures and so on. If you really want to go high tech, add a Quick Response Code to allow smartphone users to find your blog easily. For more information on QR Codes, see our March 25 blog post “More Thoughts on Business Cards” at http://bit.ly/i5ikHc.

Encourage reader feedback and sharing. When readers post comments (positive or otherwise), thank them for their effort. I only delete spam, an inevitable byproduct of blogging. I have recently become more active in soliciting feedback. I now periodically end posts by asking readers for their comments, suggestions and criticisms. I also invite suggestions for future articles. Finally, make sure your blog has plug-ins or widgets to promote article sharing through Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and any other social media vehicle you believe is likely to help capture your target markets. Allow readers to bookmark your URL to their list of favorite sites with the click of a button.

So let me end there, by inviting you to post your thoughts on CFO America’s blog. What do you like? What do you dislike? Keep it clean and I promise to approve it. Most importantly, what can I do to make the information presented more useful to you in growing a prosperous business?

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