You are Invited to my Party

Small business coach and author Robert Gerrish said, “For many, one of the greatest moments in business is the joy of attracting a new customer or client. In such circumstances, it is easy to get so caught up in the excitement that we forget to spend time on realizing the value of one of our business’s best assets, our existing client base.” For example, you may have heard banks criticized for offering free checking to new customers while charging existing customers for the same service.

As Mr. Gerrish suggests, all too often promotions only target new prospects. Show your appreciation of existing customers by holding promotions and events designed exclusively for them.

  • A special after-hours personal shopping event or trunk show, complete with entertainment, refreshments and “invitation only” discounts is an example. If your products typically require sizing or fitting (such as clothes), allowing a two day presale can create additional excitement. Customers select their purchases in advance, which you hold until the actual sale. This procedure also requires customers to visit your facility at least twice.
  • The luxury day spa I spoke of earlier invited my wife and I (did I mention she is one of their most loyal customers) to an art exhibit by a nationally recognized concert pianist. The event also included a wine tasting.

Another way to demonstrate your appreciation for existing customers, suppliers and employees is to hold an open house or reception. This is a great way to display your operations. It will also strengthen relationships between customers and staff that have not met. If your facilities do not include a suitable physical location, host it at your home, a nearby restaurant or under a tent on the front lawn. Moreover, while your open house or reception must be memorable, it does not have to be expensive. Class is not measured in dollars.

  • You may find network contacts are willing to help cater the event, print programs and menus, provide entertainment or other useful services at substantial discounts in order to promote their products and services to your customer base. Always take full advantage of your network and be ready to reciprocate by supporting and promoting their events.
  • Avoid scheduling functions on weekends or when likely to conflict with numerous holiday events. Use all of the communications tools and options previously discussed to ensure good attendance. There is nothing more discouraging than hosting a party when no one shows up.

A final caution about special event promotions is that in order to be truly special, you cannot hold them too often. Any promotional tool that is used too frequently runs the risk of creating customer expectations that will cause them to avoid full price purchases in anticipation of a sale or event that may never happen.

Next week, I will present an exciting 3-part series on my ongoing love affair with SlideShare.net. It picks up where a June series on this topic left off. I think you will enjoy it. Until then, stay safe and enjoy your weekend. You earned it!

 © 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

12 Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 3

Last week I began a discussion of things I learned about SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. Since that time, my files have had more than 4,100 combined views, 3,200 for one file alone. On Monday, I discussed how to make SlideShare an integral part of your marketing efforts.

Today I will conclude this topic with a discussion of ways to make PowerPoint slides more effective online, and how to take advantage of SlideShare to save printing cost. Here is the final part of the list:

9. I was pleased to see that PowerPoint speaker’s notes are visible for each slide. Even if you do not usually take advantage of this feature in your presentations, you should consider using it to replace whatever narrative you would ordinarily add in a live venue.

10.  One PowerPoint feature that will not translate through SlideShare is animation. I typically have numerous visuals enter and exit slides as appropriate to support my verbal narration. In reviewing my posted slide shows, I quickly noticed that all visuals are in screen. In my case, this made for some very busy slides. Consider tailoring your uploaded slides accordingly.

11.  If you decide one or more slides do not convey the full story after you view them online, you can simply adjust your PowerPoint or pdf document and replace the original file with a new upload. This will save
having to reenter descriptions and tags, something I learned was necessary after I deleted several files to make minor changes. It also maintains continuous viewing statistics.

12.  I am always surprised by the cost of printing projects. My frustration over this expense is magnified by the need to “bring a few extra copies” just in case more attendees show up than expected, while knowing most will be left behind or eventually tossed in the trash. SlideShare presents an opportunity to reduce or eliminate this outlay. I suggest presenting only a cryptic outline of your presentation at the event, probably no more than one or two pages. The purpose of this short handout is merely to facilitate note taking. It has the added advantage of directing attendees’ attention to you rather than flipping through a voluminous handout. Allow attendees to download their own slides, either before or after the seminar. Since they will only print those of interest, this is a legitimately green initiative.

As a last bit of advice, if you are one of the almost 15 million unemployed Americans, please consider creating and posting a visual resume on SlideShare.net. It will add another venue for prospective employers to find you, while demonstrating your communication skills and knowledge of current social media tools.

Well, that is my entire list. I hope you will find something of value, and more importantly that it will encourage you in your continuing pursuit of the low-cost marketing experimentation I talked so much about in my book, Highly Visible Marketing – 115 Low-cost Ways to Avoid Market Obscurity.

Finally, for the record the other two Chinese proverbs are “May you come to the attention of powerful people” and “May you find what you are looking for.” Again, both would seem to apply to my small business and
middle-market target audience, especially when you consider that the most powerful person of all is the customer whose attention you are looking for!

12 Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 2

On Friday, I began a discussion of things I learned about SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. Since that time, my seven files have had more than 3,400 combined views, 2,800 for one file alone.

I shared the first three items on my list. They discussed how to start your profile, upgrade options and social media connections. Part 2 will discuss suggestions for making SlideShare an integral part of your marketing efforts. Here is today’s list:

4. I preach a simple 12-word marketing strategy to clients and friends. It is this: Communicate one message, promoting one brand, to multiple audiences, at no cost. While Friday’s item #3 fully supports this strategy, do not stop there! I issued three free press releases (one of which can be viewed at http://bit.ly/ipIFnF), published this information using several free article marketing websites and periodically retweet links to the presentations.

5. The first slide of a PowerPoint presentation or the first page of a pdf document will appear as a small icon link on your profile page. It should be readable, attractive and descriptive to invite viewers. I display my logo and blog URL on every download. You will also be asked to provide a description, category and tags for each file. Making this information keyword rich makes it easier for interested views to locate you slide shows and videos. Making something keyword rich simply means using certain words and phrases that potential customers are likely to use in search engines when looking for your company, products or  services.

6. SlideShare gives users the option of allowing viewers to download files. Since you are posting files in a very public venue, I see no reason not to allow downloads. Additionally, presentations can be made available only to authorized viewers with any of the upgraded versions. It is then a viable option to share private files that are simply too large to email. An example might be a large contract or proposal in pdf format.

If you do not know how to create a pdf file, download CutePDF Writer at http://cutepdf.com/Products/CutePDF/writer.asp. It is a free version of commercial PDF creation software. CutePDF Writer installs itself as a printer subsystem. This enables virtually any Windows applications to create professional quality pdf documents.

7. SlideShare can be used to promote and support your event marketing efforts. For example, you can make advanced copies of upcoming seminars available online to help invitees decide whether to attend, or provide copies to interested parties who are unable to attend.

8. Users and their followers can post additional information on their wall, very similar to Facebook. I posted a notice of a free seminar based on one of my uploaded files, along with a link to EventBrite for event details. Viewers can also post comments on individual slide shows.

Please return Wednesday when we not only complete the list of 12 things I learned, but will reveal the final two Chinese proverbs.

12 Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 1

“May you live in interesting times” is the English translation of the first of three Chinese proverbs. These are very interesting times indeed for business owners struggling to market their products and services without simultaneously emptying their bank account. It seems not a week goes by that I do not learn about another free or (almost as good) low-cost marketing tool on the Internet.

This week was no exception! CFO America opened an account at SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. Users can upload files in PowerPoint and pdf formats, among others. It is comparable to YouTube, but is primarily for slideshows. Launched in 2006, the website was originally intended as a vehicle for businesses to share slides with employees. However, it has since expanded to host slides and videos for entertainment, educational and other purposes.

SlideShare claims 50 million visitors and 90 million page views per month, ranking it as one of the top 250 websites in the world. The White House used SlideShare to publish President Obama’s birth certificate in
April 2011. The impressive list of blue ribbon users also includes NASA, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, IBM, several branches of the U.S. military, Dell and the University of Texas.

Today I present the first of a three-part series on this subject. I will cover the basics of how to get started and how to increase your market exposure. I will complete the series next week.

Here are the first three things I learned about SlideShare that will help you “Avoid Market Obscurity“:

  1. Begin your exciting marketing experience by opening a free account at http://www.slideshare.net/. You will be asked to create a public profile that includes a description of your business, address and contact information, logo or picture, website link, industry, keyword tags, and other basic information. Start by visiting CFO America’s profile at http://www.slideshare.net/CFOAmerica.
  2. Like most “free” online services, this one has several upgraded versions. They range in price from $19 to $249 per month. The extra fees buy customized channels, expanded functionality, visitor analytics and the removal of banner ads, among other advantages. All upgrades include Zipcast, a virtual meeting service similar to the better-known and admittedly more robust GoToMeeting. The advantage is that subscribers receive a customized link to share with their attendees. Those attendees merely click the link without the need to download software or open a SlideShare account. Regular readers already know my advice on this one! Even if these features appeal to you, I suggest you resist the urge to upgrade until after you have had an opportunity to evaluate your experience over the first thirty to ninety days. You may find the additional cost is unnecessary. I should add that the free service includes unlimited slide shows and documents, plus three videos per month.
  3. SlideShare collaborates with social media giants Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to promote and share content. For example, you can embed presentations on your Facebook Fan Page, your LinkedIn profile or your blog. I embedded a document on my Fan Page, a simple matter of coping and pasting a code supplied by SlideShare. The document can now be opened in full screen. Viewers can also like, retweet or otherwise
    share presentations with their followers and connections.

Three of my PowerPoint presentations had over 200 combined views during their first 3 days online. One of my pdf documents (a reprint of this article) was featured on SlideShare’s home page, and was viewed over 1,500 times during its first 36 hours online. I am confident this activity, which puts to shame my YouTube statistics, was largely the result of the other social media services. Take full advantage of these capabilities for maximum market exposure.

Have a great weekend, and please plan to read Twelve Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 2 on Monday. As an added incentive to returning readers, next week I will share the final two Chinese proverbs.

Surely you won’t want to miss that!

Becoming a Recognized Expert

There is an old axiom in marketing that a prospect does not become a customer until a vendor touches them seven times. Touches or interactions involve every tool in your marketing quiver, including face-to-face meetings and free seminars. The axiom is supported by the fact that consumers prefer to do business with people and companies they know, like and trust.

The question every business must answer is how to initiate and sustain the process without crossing the fine line of being perceived as just another pushy or (worse yet) desperate sales person. Event-based marketing can be a very effective way to start the ball rolling. It will allow you to interact with potential customers and build trust as you demonstrate your expertise. It will also encourage them to seek you out for your knowledge and expertise, and to recommend you within their circle of influence.

There are several free event-listing sites available on the Internet should you wish to open your events to the public. Most allow business promoters to coordinate announcements and listings through Facebook and Twitter. Some allow you to issue tickets, limit attendance, collect fees (via PayPal) and even ask qualifying questions. Online event-listing websites include:

  • EventBrite
  • EventSync
  • Facebook Events
  • PlanCast
  • Zvents

Prospective attendees will ask themselves a very selfish question. What is in this for me? Most small businesses will welcome free advice in at least three areas: how to increase sales, how to reduce costs and how to generate more cash. Whatever your subject matter, promotional material must identify specific customer problems and promise real solutions.

Make sure information presented at the event closely matches those promotional promises. They are what drew attendees. It is unlikely that disappointed prospects, frustrated at not hearing the promised solutions, will become your customer.

The main point of your presentation is what the audience wants to hear, not what you want to tell them. Get to it quickly.

You want your audiences’ undivided attention. Therefore, present only a cryptic outline on slides and handouts at the event. Otherwise, attendees could have read the presentation at home and saved the trip.

Attendees will expect a commercial. Hold it for the last or next to last slide.

Finally, a drawing for a free gift certificate, an autographed copy of your latest book or some other valuable prize will encourage attendees to stay for the entire presentation.

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