12 Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 1

“May you live in interesting times” is the English translation of the first of three Chinese proverbs. These are very interesting times indeed for business owners struggling to market their products and services without simultaneously emptying their bank account. It seems not a week goes by that I do not learn about another free or (almost as good) low-cost marketing tool on the Internet.

This week was no exception! CFO America opened an account at SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. Users can upload files in PowerPoint and pdf formats, among others. It is comparable to YouTube, but is primarily for slideshows. Launched in 2006, the website was originally intended as a vehicle for businesses to share slides with employees. However, it has since expanded to host slides and videos for entertainment, educational and other purposes.

SlideShare claims 50 million visitors and 90 million page views per month, ranking it as one of the top 250 websites in the world. The White House used SlideShare to publish President Obama’s birth certificate in
April 2011. The impressive list of blue ribbon users also includes NASA, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, IBM, several branches of the U.S. military, Dell and the University of Texas.

Today I present the first of a three-part series on this subject. I will cover the basics of how to get started and how to increase your market exposure. I will complete the series next week.

Here are the first three things I learned about SlideShare that will help you “Avoid Market Obscurity“:

  1. Begin your exciting marketing experience by opening a free account at http://www.slideshare.net/. You will be asked to create a public profile that includes a description of your business, address and contact information, logo or picture, website link, industry, keyword tags, and other basic information. Start by visiting CFO America’s profile at http://www.slideshare.net/CFOAmerica.
  2. Like most “free” online services, this one has several upgraded versions. They range in price from $19 to $249 per month. The extra fees buy customized channels, expanded functionality, visitor analytics and the removal of banner ads, among other advantages. All upgrades include Zipcast, a virtual meeting service similar to the better-known and admittedly more robust GoToMeeting. The advantage is that subscribers receive a customized link to share with their attendees. Those attendees merely click the link without the need to download software or open a SlideShare account. Regular readers already know my advice on this one! Even if these features appeal to you, I suggest you resist the urge to upgrade until after you have had an opportunity to evaluate your experience over the first thirty to ninety days. You may find the additional cost is unnecessary. I should add that the free service includes unlimited slide shows and documents, plus three videos per month.
  3. SlideShare collaborates with social media giants Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to promote and share content. For example, you can embed presentations on your Facebook Fan Page, your LinkedIn profile or your blog. I embedded a document on my Fan Page, a simple matter of coping and pasting a code supplied by SlideShare. The document can now be opened in full screen. Viewers can also like, retweet or otherwise
    share presentations with their followers and connections.

Three of my PowerPoint presentations had over 200 combined views during their first 3 days online. One of my pdf documents (a reprint of this article) was featured on SlideShare’s home page, and was viewed over 1,500 times during its first 36 hours online. I am confident this activity, which puts to shame my YouTube statistics, was largely the result of the other social media services. Take full advantage of these capabilities for maximum market exposure.

Have a great weekend, and please plan to read Twelve Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 2 on Monday. As an added incentive to returning readers, next week I will share the final two Chinese proverbs.

Surely you won’t want to miss that!

Improving Those Email Statistics

I am in the process of completing and preparing for a series of free seminars called “What’s Your Story”? It deals with ways of communicating a consistent marketing message and brand to multiple audiences at little or no out-of-pocket cost. In the presentation, I use email marketing to illustrate why you need to use multiple communication channels to reach your entire target market.

Email has at least one major advantage over many other channels. It is very easy to study statistics and trends in things like open rates and click through rates. One of the major vendors tracks open rates by about 30 industry categories. The highest is only 27%. That means that an average email campaign can expect that fewer than three out of every 10 people who receive the email are going to open it. More importantly, recognize that the largest part of your target market will never make it on to your distribution list.

Your email needs to be above average! It is critically important to squeeze the best possible results out of your email marketing efforts. Experiment with things like how the timing and subject line of your email effects the statistics. I read an interesting post called The 4 Words That Will Get Your Email Opened by Sean Platt of the copyblogger.com. It said that in his experience, the most effective subject line for virtually any type of email marketing distribution was simply “You Are Not Alone.” Platt’s theory is this headline appeals to a universal human need to know there is someone who shares our common experiences and is willing to help solve our problems. Interesting theory Sean. I may experiment with that one myself!

There is another theory (unproven in my mind) that people will work harder to maintain what they already have than to gain something they need. You can test this hypothesis by tailoring your subject lines accordingly. For example, a marketing newsletter might be promoted from the perspective of how to maintain existing customers. A human resources discussion could be presented in terms of how to motivate and retain valuable employees. The same thought applies to event marketing.

As email has matured as a communications media, people have become more discerning not only in what they open but also in giving out email addresses. Do not abuse or waste an engraved invitation to their inbox. Allow me a simple analogy to illustrate the point. Whatever subject line you choose, remember that it is only an invitation to your electronic party. Like a real party, you still need to deliver “the goods” that your guests are expecting when they arrive. The expected goods are either valuable information or a chance to save money on your products and services. If you fail to deliver, they are unlikely to attend another party.

As you are writing copy for an email newsletter, article marketing, blogging, and so on, also keep in mind that the average reader is very busy and perhaps somewhat impatient. They are not searching for an online English translation of Tolstoy’s War and Peace. They are looking for interesting, concise articles and information that provide relevant content in a reader-friendly format. Tailor your writing style to match that profile for maximum opens. Again, this also applies to event marketing.

Finally, you might be tempted to save the cost of an email service and simply send a mass distribution to all your contacts in Microsoft Outlook. A reason not to do that is that email services offer spam-checking software that will identify potential problems in your wording and structure. Make corrections accordingly and avoid being trapped in recipients’ spam filters. Instead of sending emails with Outlook, visit MailChimp.com. They allow you to send emails to 2,000 recipients free.

Have a safe weekend. I want you back here bright and early Monday morning.

Becoming a Recognized Expert

There is an old axiom in marketing that a prospect does not become a customer until a vendor touches them seven times. Touches or interactions involve every tool in your marketing quiver, including face-to-face meetings and free seminars. The axiom is supported by the fact that consumers prefer to do business with people and companies they know, like and trust.

The question every business must answer is how to initiate and sustain the process without crossing the fine line of being perceived as just another pushy or (worse yet) desperate sales person. Event-based marketing can be a very effective way to start the ball rolling. It will allow you to interact with potential customers and build trust as you demonstrate your expertise. It will also encourage them to seek you out for your knowledge and expertise, and to recommend you within their circle of influence.

There are several free event-listing sites available on the Internet should you wish to open your events to the public. Most allow business promoters to coordinate announcements and listings through Facebook and Twitter. Some allow you to issue tickets, limit attendance, collect fees (via PayPal) and even ask qualifying questions. Online event-listing websites include:

  • EventBrite
  • EventSync
  • Facebook Events
  • PlanCast
  • Zvents

Prospective attendees will ask themselves a very selfish question. What is in this for me? Most small businesses will welcome free advice in at least three areas: how to increase sales, how to reduce costs and how to generate more cash. Whatever your subject matter, promotional material must identify specific customer problems and promise real solutions.

Make sure information presented at the event closely matches those promotional promises. They are what drew attendees. It is unlikely that disappointed prospects, frustrated at not hearing the promised solutions, will become your customer.

The main point of your presentation is what the audience wants to hear, not what you want to tell them. Get to it quickly.

You want your audiences’ undivided attention. Therefore, present only a cryptic outline on slides and handouts at the event. Otherwise, attendees could have read the presentation at home and saved the trip.

Attendees will expect a commercial. Hold it for the last or next to last slide.

Finally, a drawing for a free gift certificate, an autographed copy of your latest book or some other valuable prize will encourage attendees to stay for the entire presentation.

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