You Can Have Any Color You Want, As Long As You Want Black (Part 2)

Today I conclude the article on product driven versus market driven companies. I began by discussing the cultural differences between the two. Product driven companies concentrate on achieving and maintaining technical superiority. Market driven companies devote resources to brand development and customer communications.

Companies and industries sometimes attempt to adapt their marketing strategy in response to changing competition and other market forces. For example, conditions slowly but dramatically changed for the entire American automotive industry over the next 50 years. Detroit’s response to the 1973 oil embargo was a textbook case of a failed attempt to adapt. Faced with the first ever non-wartime limit on the availability of cheap gasoline, the American consumer suddenly became very conscious of gas mileage.

At the time, Japanese and European companies dominated the market for fuel-efficient sub-compacts. American manufacturers’ knee-jerk response was to jump headfirst into a market they had ignored until recently. They stepped up production of the notoriously undependable Ford Pinto (voted the worst car of all time), the Chevrolet Vega and the AMC Gremlin.

Detroit’s failure took a personal toll on an entire generation of consumers. My first car was a red, white and blue Pinto. It was a cornucopia of expensive mechanical problems, unrelenting frustration on a 94-inch wheelbase. I sold it just before a massive recall for an exploding gas tank problem that would eventually cost Ford millions of dollars in legal settlements.

My next car, a Toyota, sparked a love affair with foreign cars that continues today. It was 30 years before I bought another Ford, a pickup truck for my son. It took almost as long for American manufacturers to overcome the image of producing inferior cars. It remains to be seen whether they will ever regain the world market share they once enjoyed.

How have things changed since I bought that damn Pinto?

A national chain of men’s discount stores advertised, “An educated consumer is our best customer.” For a product driven company in 2011, an educated consumer might be more aptly described as their worst nightmare. Service industry executive and strategic planning expert Michael O’Loughlin recently summarized the reason. He said, “Thanks to the Internet, the consumer has come to believe that no concessions are ever necessary. They expect unlimited choices in meeting their needs.”

Potential customers are only a few clicks away from a myriad of rival goods and services. A consumer with a smartphone can compare competitors’ prices on the spot. Any business, even the smallest local operation, ignores those powerful market realities at their own peril. Broadening your product line or services can help fend off competition by better addressing market needs, and improve customer retention in the process.

The men’s store chain recently filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. One analyst said they had failed to keep up with the increasingly competitive off-priced clothing market.

My final point is that few successful companies employ an entirely one-sided strategy. They operate along a moving spectrum on which there are few absolutes, and no strategy guaranteed to bring success or failure.

Consider Ford one last time. Product limitations notwithstanding, they still managed to sell over 15 million units between 1908 and 1927. At one point, half of all the cars in the world were Model T’s. That production record stood until the Volkswagen Beetle finally surpassed it in 1972.

The correct strategy for your business is the one that is executable within the constraints of your cost structure and marketing budget, and that produces the highest net cash flow given all the relevant factors at work in your market and your competition.

I began this article with an old quote. I end with another. A marketing adage says, “You have to sell from your own wagon.” It refers to a bygone era when merchants plied their trade by pushing handcarts up and down urban streets. The adage may be true. However, today you get to decide how big your wagon is, and what products or services it carries.

Go forth and sell!

 © 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

What Can Online PR Do for Your Small Business?

Today, I am pleased to have my very knowledgeable friend, Jim Bowman as a gust author. Regular readers to my blog will immediately recognize that his topic for today is near and dear to my heart.

Jim is a public relations expert. His 25-year career leading corporate communications departments included building one of the world’s top 10 global brands, and consultant to a national agency that launched the forerunner of the Blackberry. Jim was also a public affairs officer in the Secretary of the Air Force Office of Public Affairs, Eastern Region.

For the past decade, Jim has immersed himself in the ever-evolving world of online PR to serve clients ranging from startups to well-known publicly held corporations. Through that experience, he developed an approach that integrates the best of traditional and online public relations. Jim strongly believes that no PR professional can afford to ignore online PR or outsource it to specialists. It is an essential part of the skill set all PR professionals must have, as fundamental as writing, pitching and building relationships.

For more information on this subject, or to contact Jim Bowman, please visit http://www.theprdoc.com/.

Jim writes:

I subscribe to a number of online PR and marketing news alerts to track developments and trends. The quality is not uniformly good, and unfortunately, the feeds that consistently come up short are about small business marketing and public relations.

PR people spend considerable time debating how to charge and how to get others to appreciate them more, but few weigh in on how best to serve the needs of small businesses.

Considering the difficulty I have locating meaningful insights, I imagine small business owners find it at least equally difficult. It’s time to change that.

Make Your Image Big Online

Online PR offers small businesses a chance to look much bigger than they are, so they can compete more effectively with companies many times their own size.

If you own a small business and you’re not using any form of public relations in your marketing mix – especially online PR – you’re missing out on a great way promote your business.

I say that as a former small business owner who has done “traditional” public relations for global giants and pre-IPO start-ups. Now I help small businesses use public relations to do more business and make more money.

Public Relations Attributes

PR often is used interchangeably with publicity, but that’s a mistake. In some cases, good PR involves getting no publicity at all. Among other things, PR is:

  • Interacting with your constituencies – prospects, clients, vendors, employees, your community and the public at large – to build your brand, image and reputation;
  • Getting the benefit third-party credibility when others say good things about your products and services;
  • A long-term proposition – you must work at it consistently for months and years to get best results;

Online PR Is…

All of the above and more, using digital tools that include:

  • Keyword research;
  • Search engine optimized content – press releases, articles, videos, blog posts and informational web pages;
  • A variety of specialized websites;
  • Simultaneous outreach to prospects and customers, as well as journalists.

Public relations always has been a great way for small businesses to get known, usually at substantially less cost than advertising. The Internet magnifies and increases the effectiveness of online PR and makes it an essential tool for small businesses.

Today, small brick and mortar businesses that have flown under the radar of local newspapers are finding audiences online. PR pros who know how to serve them are doing well, as are business owners with the inclination and time to do their own public relations.

 

Thank you, Jim. I’m sure my readers have enjoyed this topic, and look forward to hearing from you again soon.

  • RSS
  • Newsletter
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn