Bull Horns in Cyberspace, Part 2

On Wednesday, I began a discussion of things we can do to attract attention to our blogs, and some of the mistakes I have made over the past six months as a blogger. Today I will conclude this topic with Part 2 of Bull Horns in Cyberspace.

Here are my thoughts and suggestions for today:

Find your style. A little trick I have learned that seems to work well is to study a new marketing tool, process, etc., and then write about what I learned. For example, I recently wrote a three-part article called Twelve Things I Learned about SlideShare. I write from the point of view of reporting what I know at the end of the process that I wish I had known at the start. I offer advice to those considering using the same tool, and discuss how to be more effective in communicating their message to an ever-widening audience.

Use other social media to promote your blog. I always post summaries of blog posts on Facebook, Twitter and occasionally LinkedIn. Facebook allows a 420 character article summary, LinkedIn 700. Always leave room for a hyperlink to your blog. Consider using a URL shortener like https://bitly.com/ if you are pressed for space. This is even more important to accommodate Twitter’s 140-character limit. Abbreviated versions of three or four articles are also featured in my monthly newsletter, which is distributed free through MailChimp to over 700 people. Finally, I am having some encouraging preliminary results by posting entire articles on SlideShare.net.

Do not overlook the value of paper in promoting your blog. Add your web address to business cards, print media ads, Yellow Page listings (you remember those, right?), letterheads, email signatures and so on. If you really want to go high tech, add a Quick Response Code to allow smartphone users to find your blog easily. For more information on QR Codes, see our March 25 blog post “More Thoughts on Business Cards” at http://bit.ly/i5ikHc.

Encourage reader feedback and sharing. When readers post comments (positive or otherwise), thank them for their effort. I only delete spam, an inevitable byproduct of blogging. I have recently become more active in soliciting feedback. I now periodically end posts by asking readers for their comments, suggestions and criticisms. I also invite suggestions for future articles. Finally, make sure your blog has plug-ins or widgets to promote article sharing through Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and any other social media vehicle you believe is likely to help capture your target markets. Allow readers to bookmark your URL to their list of favorite sites with the click of a button.

So let me end there, by inviting you to post your thoughts on CFO America’s blog. What do you like? What do you dislike? Keep it clean and I promise to approve it. Most importantly, what can I do to make the information presented more useful to you in growing a prosperous business?

Bull Horns in Cyberspace, Part 1

Last Friday CFO America’s blog began with the question, “If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does it make a noise?” It concluded by assuring readers that falling tress always make noise. That got me thinking about things we can do to make noise, or rather what we can do to attract attention to our blogs. It also caused me to reflect on some of the mistakes I have made over the past six months (listen to me, the battle-hardened veteran) as a blogger.

Today I will present Part 1 of a two-part article on this topic. Here are my thoughts for today:

1. Pick a schedule and stick to it! The correct blogging frequency is whatever best helps you connect with your target audience. For some blogs that may be daily, for others once a month. Unfortunately, this is not a variable that invites experimentation. Fortunately, it is not so much a question of having the optimal blogging frequency. Simply commit to a schedule and tell your readers when to expect new posts. While most bloggers enjoy writing, too great a frequency can be grueling. I blog every Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning, something I have done faithfully except for a handful of holidays. As you gain followers, do not confuse or disappoint them by not keeping your commitment. Here are a few thoughts to help ease the burden of your commitment.

  • Consider using guest writers periodically. That way your readers are treated to different areas of expertise and points of view. It is also a great way to support your friends and network contacts. Hopefully, they will reciprocate and share some of your articles on their website, further extending your reach through cyberspace.
  • Instead of your usual topics or content, occasionally supplement your original writing by sharing (with appropriate attribution) relevant quotes, historical notes, articles and tips written by others. You might also ask readers to suggest topics.
  • Do not give up too quickly. As I said on Friday, Fred Campos of FunCitySocialMedia believes it takes about 100 posts before you begin to build a following. Many bloggers become discouraged and give up before reaching that milestone.

2. Keep posts short, preferably under 600 words. I say this for three reasons.

  • First, readers are looking for “McNuggets” of actionable information, not the English translation of War and Peace.
  • Secondly, the average American adult reads 250 to 300 words per minute. Numerous studies suggest that over 65% of visitors spend less than 2 minutes on a website. Therefore, an entry longer than 600 words will not be read in its entirety, if at all. I should add that the average time spent on CFO America’s blog is three minutes and nine seconds, an unusually long time, but one for which I am grateful!
  • I began blogging by posting excerpts from my book, Highly Visible Marketing, 115 Low-cost Ways to Avoid Market Obscurity. By making blog entries too long, I undoubtedly lost readers before the end of long articles. More importantly, I also ran through my previously written material too quickly. Save some your creative material for another day! A better alternative to lengthy articles is to split them into multiple parts, posting them in consecutive entries. I begin with a brief review of what was discussed in the previous blog, and end by telling readers what to expect in the next entry.

Let me now practice what I preach by ending for today. On Friday, I will present Part 2 of On Bull Horns in Cyberspace. It will discuss suggestions for defining your style and promoting your blog through other social media tools.

Until Friday, please continue to provide valuable feedback and share this information with your friends, coworkers and other associates. Why not add a comment below before leaving today?

 

 

You Are Not Alone!

There’s an old saying that asks, “If a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, does it make a noise?” Bloggers might ask a similar question. “If I post something on my blog and no one responds, did anyone read it?”

I am reminded of a story I’ve previously shared. The 2009 movie Julie and Julia recounts the real life story of Julie Powell as portrayed by actress Amy Adams. It tells of Powell’s 2002 experience writing a daily blog of recipes from Julia Child’s book Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Powell’s personal commitment was to prepare and discuss 524 recipes in 365 days, all in her tiny apartment. Early on, the only feedback her blog received were critical comments from her mother. She had no idea whether anyone else was reading her content. After a few months, the blog slowly caught on. It eventually became a great American success story. Her posts were later compiled into her book, Julie & Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen. The book went become a best seller and the first of several books she has authored.

Fred Campos of FunCitySocialMedia assures me it takes about 100 posts before you begin to build a following for your blog. In his experience, the average blogger becomes discouraged and gives up long before their 100th post. While I have been unable to find any authoritative source to support Fred, Powell’s experience certainly seems to support him. So does mine.

I posted my first entry on http://www.CFOAmerica.biz December 31, 2010. As of today, I have made 89 entries to my blog, 76 of which have been extracts from my book Highly Visible Marketing – 115 Low-cost Ways to Avoid Market Obscurity. I received my first comment on January 9. It was in response to the December 31 post. At that moment, I knew exactly how Sally Fields felt as she walked up to accept her 1979 Oscar for Norma Rea screaming, “You like me! You Like me!”

Since then, I have received 82 other comments, an average of slightly less than 1 every other day. But I’ve noticed several interesting trends lurking just below the surface of the raw data. First, comments do not come evenly. Far from it! I’ve had two days, both in June, when I’ve received over 20 comments in a single day. In between, there have been weeks of deafening, ego-shattering silence.

Secondly, we lose sight of the fact that once launched into cyberspace, blog posts are “out there” forever. I am often surprised to see comments on blog entries posted weeks early. For example, just yesterday I received a comment on something I wrote on February 28, seventeen weeks ago.

So let me end with three final comments:

  1. First, falling trees always make noise, even if no one hears them. They are too powerful a force of nature to do otherwise.
  2. Therefore, STAY THE COURSE! If you believe in your message, then believe that people will benefit when (not if) they read it. Don’t give up when success might be just around the next bend in the road.
  3. Last and most important, to everyone who has been kind enough to share their thoughts and encouragement through comments on CFO America’s blog over the past six months, THANK YOU! Please continue to support us through your comments and by sharing our content with your friends and associates.

Have a safe and joyous Fourth of July holiday, as we celebrate our great nation’s independence from the tyranny of that was the crown. I am going to take the day off, but I’ll be back bright and early on Wednesday, July 6.

12 Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 3

Last week I began a discussion of things I learned about SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. Since that time, my files have had more than 4,100 combined views, 3,200 for one file alone. On Monday, I discussed how to make SlideShare an integral part of your marketing efforts.

Today I will conclude this topic with a discussion of ways to make PowerPoint slides more effective online, and how to take advantage of SlideShare to save printing cost. Here is the final part of the list:

9. I was pleased to see that PowerPoint speaker’s notes are visible for each slide. Even if you do not usually take advantage of this feature in your presentations, you should consider using it to replace whatever narrative you would ordinarily add in a live venue.

10.  One PowerPoint feature that will not translate through SlideShare is animation. I typically have numerous visuals enter and exit slides as appropriate to support my verbal narration. In reviewing my posted slide shows, I quickly noticed that all visuals are in screen. In my case, this made for some very busy slides. Consider tailoring your uploaded slides accordingly.

11.  If you decide one or more slides do not convey the full story after you view them online, you can simply adjust your PowerPoint or pdf document and replace the original file with a new upload. This will save
having to reenter descriptions and tags, something I learned was necessary after I deleted several files to make minor changes. It also maintains continuous viewing statistics.

12.  I am always surprised by the cost of printing projects. My frustration over this expense is magnified by the need to “bring a few extra copies” just in case more attendees show up than expected, while knowing most will be left behind or eventually tossed in the trash. SlideShare presents an opportunity to reduce or eliminate this outlay. I suggest presenting only a cryptic outline of your presentation at the event, probably no more than one or two pages. The purpose of this short handout is merely to facilitate note taking. It has the added advantage of directing attendees’ attention to you rather than flipping through a voluminous handout. Allow attendees to download their own slides, either before or after the seminar. Since they will only print those of interest, this is a legitimately green initiative.

As a last bit of advice, if you are one of the almost 15 million unemployed Americans, please consider creating and posting a visual resume on SlideShare.net. It will add another venue for prospective employers to find you, while demonstrating your communication skills and knowledge of current social media tools.

Well, that is my entire list. I hope you will find something of value, and more importantly that it will encourage you in your continuing pursuit of the low-cost marketing experimentation I talked so much about in my book, Highly Visible Marketing – 115 Low-cost Ways to Avoid Market Obscurity.

Finally, for the record the other two Chinese proverbs are “May you come to the attention of powerful people” and “May you find what you are looking for.” Again, both would seem to apply to my small business and
middle-market target audience, especially when you consider that the most powerful person of all is the customer whose attention you are looking for!

12 Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 2

On Friday, I began a discussion of things I learned about SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. Since that time, my seven files have had more than 3,400 combined views, 2,800 for one file alone.

I shared the first three items on my list. They discussed how to start your profile, upgrade options and social media connections. Part 2 will discuss suggestions for making SlideShare an integral part of your marketing efforts. Here is today’s list:

4. I preach a simple 12-word marketing strategy to clients and friends. It is this: Communicate one message, promoting one brand, to multiple audiences, at no cost. While Friday’s item #3 fully supports this strategy, do not stop there! I issued three free press releases (one of which can be viewed at http://bit.ly/ipIFnF), published this information using several free article marketing websites and periodically retweet links to the presentations.

5. The first slide of a PowerPoint presentation or the first page of a pdf document will appear as a small icon link on your profile page. It should be readable, attractive and descriptive to invite viewers. I display my logo and blog URL on every download. You will also be asked to provide a description, category and tags for each file. Making this information keyword rich makes it easier for interested views to locate you slide shows and videos. Making something keyword rich simply means using certain words and phrases that potential customers are likely to use in search engines when looking for your company, products or  services.

6. SlideShare gives users the option of allowing viewers to download files. Since you are posting files in a very public venue, I see no reason not to allow downloads. Additionally, presentations can be made available only to authorized viewers with any of the upgraded versions. It is then a viable option to share private files that are simply too large to email. An example might be a large contract or proposal in pdf format.

If you do not know how to create a pdf file, download CutePDF Writer at http://cutepdf.com/Products/CutePDF/writer.asp. It is a free version of commercial PDF creation software. CutePDF Writer installs itself as a printer subsystem. This enables virtually any Windows applications to create professional quality pdf documents.

7. SlideShare can be used to promote and support your event marketing efforts. For example, you can make advanced copies of upcoming seminars available online to help invitees decide whether to attend, or provide copies to interested parties who are unable to attend.

8. Users and their followers can post additional information on their wall, very similar to Facebook. I posted a notice of a free seminar based on one of my uploaded files, along with a link to EventBrite for event details. Viewers can also post comments on individual slide shows.

Please return Wednesday when we not only complete the list of 12 things I learned, but will reveal the final two Chinese proverbs.

12 Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 1

“May you live in interesting times” is the English translation of the first of three Chinese proverbs. These are very interesting times indeed for business owners struggling to market their products and services without simultaneously emptying their bank account. It seems not a week goes by that I do not learn about another free or (almost as good) low-cost marketing tool on the Internet.

This week was no exception! CFO America opened an account at SlideShare.net, a free online slide hosting service. Users can upload files in PowerPoint and pdf formats, among others. It is comparable to YouTube, but is primarily for slideshows. Launched in 2006, the website was originally intended as a vehicle for businesses to share slides with employees. However, it has since expanded to host slides and videos for entertainment, educational and other purposes.

SlideShare claims 50 million visitors and 90 million page views per month, ranking it as one of the top 250 websites in the world. The White House used SlideShare to publish President Obama’s birth certificate in
April 2011. The impressive list of blue ribbon users also includes NASA, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, IBM, several branches of the U.S. military, Dell and the University of Texas.

Today I present the first of a three-part series on this subject. I will cover the basics of how to get started and how to increase your market exposure. I will complete the series next week.

Here are the first three things I learned about SlideShare that will help you “Avoid Market Obscurity“:

  1. Begin your exciting marketing experience by opening a free account at http://www.slideshare.net/. You will be asked to create a public profile that includes a description of your business, address and contact information, logo or picture, website link, industry, keyword tags, and other basic information. Start by visiting CFO America’s profile at http://www.slideshare.net/CFOAmerica.
  2. Like most “free” online services, this one has several upgraded versions. They range in price from $19 to $249 per month. The extra fees buy customized channels, expanded functionality, visitor analytics and the removal of banner ads, among other advantages. All upgrades include Zipcast, a virtual meeting service similar to the better-known and admittedly more robust GoToMeeting. The advantage is that subscribers receive a customized link to share with their attendees. Those attendees merely click the link without the need to download software or open a SlideShare account. Regular readers already know my advice on this one! Even if these features appeal to you, I suggest you resist the urge to upgrade until after you have had an opportunity to evaluate your experience over the first thirty to ninety days. You may find the additional cost is unnecessary. I should add that the free service includes unlimited slide shows and documents, plus three videos per month.
  3. SlideShare collaborates with social media giants Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn to promote and share content. For example, you can embed presentations on your Facebook Fan Page, your LinkedIn profile or your blog. I embedded a document on my Fan Page, a simple matter of coping and pasting a code supplied by SlideShare. The document can now be opened in full screen. Viewers can also like, retweet or otherwise
    share presentations with their followers and connections.

Three of my PowerPoint presentations had over 200 combined views during their first 3 days online. One of my pdf documents (a reprint of this article) was featured on SlideShare’s home page, and was viewed over 1,500 times during its first 36 hours online. I am confident this activity, which puts to shame my YouTube statistics, was largely the result of the other social media services. Take full advantage of these capabilities for maximum market exposure.

Have a great weekend, and please plan to read Twelve Things I Learned About SlideShare, Part 2 on Monday. As an added incentive to returning readers, next week I will share the final two Chinese proverbs.

Surely you won’t want to miss that!

Nine Things I learned about YouTube-Part 2

Wednesday’s blog post discussed the first four things I learned about creating YouTube videos. It covered hardware and software requirements, and their cost. I hope you were as surprised as I was to learn you don’t have to spend a lot of money, and may already have everything you need.

Today, I will complete the list. Here are items 5 through 9:

5. Windows Live Movie maker or WLMM allows you to import entire PowerPoint presentations or individual slides. This is useful if your video subject matter is technical and requires visual aids. It is far more professional than writing on a flipchart with your back to the camera. The trick is to save documents as png or tif files, rather than in PowerPoint. The software also imports pictures. You can then narrate off-screen, or just use them to spice up your video.

6. Whether you import videos, slides or pictures, MLMM presents a plethora of editing options. I found the ability to end videos before that awkward moment when I walk off-screen to stop the camera is especially helpful. For that reason, stand motionless and silent for one or two seconds before you end a video or slide. It will make for a cleaner break as you transition into the next slide. The standard length of a slide will be 7 seconds, but that is easily changed to accommodate your need. There are also countless video and animation special effects, which I have yet to explore. One feature that I do plan to incorporate into my next video is captions. I might, as an example, include my web address or contact information in the presentation.

7. You can record narrations with Sound Recorder, and match them with the appropriate slide. If you are a type-A person as I am, concentrate on speaking at a moderate pace. Again, you can edit the duration, adjust the volume and fade in and out of the audio. You can also import music.

8. One feature of WLMM did surprise and disappoint me. Perhaps I missed something, but my computer saved the videos into something called a wlmp file format. YouTube supports a wide variety of formats, but wlmp is not among them. After a little research and experimentation, I discovered some good news. You can upload directly from WLMM to YouTube by simply clicking the appropriate “Share Button” in the upper right Toolbar. I found a technical explanation of why this works, but who cares? Problem solved!

9. Finally, once you have successfully uploaded your finished video, keep in mind that YouTube allows you to do some basic Search Engine Optimization or SEO. It allows a description and tags. As always, make them keyword rich. Fred Campos, the founder of FunCitySocialMedia, suggests you include your company’s name in video titles. Since the end game is to have people locate and watch you videos, do not over-look this important step.

Well, that’s my list. I hope you will find something of use here, and more importantly that it will encourage you to pursue more of the low-cost marketing experimentation I talked so much about in my book. If you would like to see CFO America ShiningStar Studio’s (a wholly owned subsidiary of just plain old CFO America) premiere video, please visit http://bit.ly/lx8ard.

Have a great weekend, and thanks to all the faithful readers who have so kindly posted comments and words of encouragement on this blog. Please continue to spread the word!

Nine Things I learned about YouTube-Part 1

A few weeks ago, having recently published Highly Visible Marketing, I had a guilt-stricken moment. You know the experience, the one where you suddenly realize you’re not following
the very advice you so freely give to others. In my case, it was driven by having advocated YouTube as a free marketing tool in your social media arsenal, something I had yet to do myself. Having resolved to “practice what I preach” I published my first YouTube video yesterday. The experience was so cathartic that I decided to blog about it.

Frankly,  my video has yet to snag an Academy Award nomination for best cinematography or sound editing. I am especially disappointed at being ignored for Best Costume, given that I wore a freshly laundered shirt. However, I did learn a few things in the process that might save you time and money, and might encourage readers to “take the plunge” into producing their own YouTube videos.

Today, I’ll share the first four things I learned, those dealing with required hardware and software, and how much you can expect to spend. Here is today’s list:

  1. I began my YouTube adventure expecting to spend several hundred dollars to get the hardware and software I’d need. That did not prove to be necessary. I initially explored several software packages that would provide basic editing capabilities. Each had a price tag of around $100. It turns out my Windows operating system already had two pieces of software that provide all the functionality I need. Unless you fancy yourself as the Steven Spielberg of social media, so does yours! They are Windows Live Movie Maker (“WLMM”) and Sound Recorder.
  2. Although most computers have a built in microphone, the audio from mine sounded muffled and distant. I invested $15 in a basic headset (available at any big-box store that sells computers or audio equipment), which although far from perfect, greatly enhanced the sound quality.
  3. You will need a video camera to complete the full range of input options you’ll want. Almost any digital camera or cell phone will work, but video quality and ease of uploading to your computer can be issues. I initially planned to buy a Cisco Flip video camera, the preferred camera of most people I know who are active on YouTube. I quickly learned this brand has been discontinued. Instead, I bought a comparable Sony Bloggie camera for $149. One word of advice is to make sure your camera has a tripod mount.
  4. Finally, I also bought a mid-range web camera, which was on sale for $15. This tool could replace the need for a microphone and a video camera. However, I found the sound and video quality both somewhat lacking. More significantly, I would be forever tied to filming in front of my computer. With a son in the military and the free availability of Skype (an awesome product I plan to discuss at length in my next book), the money was still well spent.

On Friday, I will discuss the final five items. I’ll see you then! In the meantime, locate WLMM and Sound Recorder on your computer and start drafting that first script!

Energizing Your Work Force

Mary Kay Ash, the founder of Mary Kay Cosmetics once said, “Everyone has an invisible sign hanging from their neck saying, make me feel important. Never forget this message when working with people.”

Her quote applies to both customers and employees. Today, I want to apply it to your employees. Make sure every employee fully understands how important the accomplishment of his or her individual goals is to achieving overall company success. Publicly praise them when they accomplish a major milestone toward achieving those goals.

Do not assume every employee knows all they need to know about your products, services, company policies or even the basics of sales and customer service. Make the effort to ensure they are adequately trained on all critical aspects of your business. Simply teaching them to up sell by always asking the equivalent of the fast food industry’s standard question, “Do you want fries with that order?” will go a long way toward increasing average customer purchases.

Why is this important? Alan J. Zell, author and retail marketing expert says, “Every business needs more business. That is an accepted fact. The unaccepted fact is that most businesses don’t use all the opportunities available that will bring them additional business. When one looks for additional business, the primary goal should center around getting second sales. What are second sales and why are they important? Second sales are add-on sales, repeat sales and sale by referral. They are important because they are much less expensive to get than first sales.”

If you would like to see Mr. Zell’s advice in practice, try leaving a shoe store without being asked if you need extra laces, polish and a few extra pairs of socks to go with your new shoes. It cannot be done!

I talked earlier about the importance of networking. Here are two simple suggestions that will make your employees feel appreciated, and give you the opportunity to grow your business through their network contacts.

  • If there are too many networking opportunities for one person, have a key employee join a group or two. It will be a growth experience for them and it demonstrates your trust and appreciation.
  • I can still remember my excitement over 35 years ago when, having just graduated college, I brought my first business card home and presented it to my father. I do not know who was prouder, my dad or me. I also gave copies to everyone I knew, and probably strangers I passed on the street. However, what I attributed to pride, my employer probably chalked up to that cheap advertising I talked about in Chapter 3. Order business cards for all your permanent employees. They are sure to hand them out generously.

Let’s meet again on Wednesday. And remember, you have just one week to submit your entry for CFO America’s contest and a chance to win a $100 gift card. Please visit http://bit.ly/iImrPd for details.

Multi-cultural Marketing

I want to expand on an idea I first suggested several weeks ago. I mention it again because I believe that for many small and mid-sized businesses, it has tremendous potential to tap into largely ignored or under-served market segments.

The suggestion is simply to consider offering your products or services to non-English speaking customers. Here are some statistics that might influence your strategic decisions. The social impact of this data is
profound. You must decide its marketing significance.

  • A U.S. Census Bureau report titled Language Use in the United States: 2007 estimated 55 million Americans over the age of five (20% of the population) spoke a language other than English at home. That compared to 23 million in 1980.
  • According to the same 2007 Census Bureau report, 35 million Americans over the age of five speak Spanish as their primary language at home. Only half considered themselves able to speak English
    very well. That percentage is comparable to those who speak Asian and Pacific Island languages at home. With 8 million Americans and a 250% increase since 1980, this is the fastest growing of any language group reported.
  • The report found that California, Texas, Florida and New York reported a combined Hispanic population of 27 million people, with nine other states having populations in excess of 500 thousand Hispanics.
  • According to the 2009 Annual report of the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility or HACR, 10 million U.S. Hispanic households represent a consumer market of $1 trillion.
  • A March 22, 2011 article in USA Today by David Lieberman had an indication of how prominent the Hispanic culture has become in the American Southwest. That article reported that Texas alone now has 154 Spanish-speaking radio stations, up from 25 ten years ago. The same source reported that the number of Hispanic radio listeners increased by 1.1 million in 2010.
  • Finally, according to the Kansas City-based Kauffman Foundation, 30% of all new business owners in 2010 were Hispanic, compared to 13% in 1996. Overall, immigrants are more than twice as likely to
    start businesses as people born in the United States are. These statistics are especially relevant if you have a significant business-to-business component in your value proposition.

Have I convinced you of the sales potential of some level of bilingual marketing? If so, start by perform a cost-benefit analysis of bilingual resources that includes your staff, marketing material, social
networking platforms and basic company forms such as estimates, proposals, invoices and statements.

Let me end with a tip that may make this idea affordable to even the tightest budget.

  • According to a May 2009 article by Al Neuharth (founder of USA Today) titled College Decision Day, there are 4,352 colleges, universities, and junior colleges in the United States. The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business reported in Business School Data Trends and 2010 List of Accredited Schools that there are 454 institutions offering MBA programs.

Many of these institutions include unpaid internships as part of their curriculum requirements. As you consider today’s idea, consider also whether a bilingual intern could assist you in its implementation.

I look forward to meeting again on Monday. Until then, please read http://bit.ly/iImrPd for details of how you can help me celebrate my birthday next week and win a $100 gift card from the Olive Garden in the process. You can then post your contest entry at  http://www.facebook.com/CFOAmerica.

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