What Can Online PR Do for Your Small Business?

Today, I am pleased to have my very knowledgeable friend, Jim Bowman as a gust author. Regular readers to my blog will immediately recognize that his topic for today is near and dear to my heart.

Jim is a public relations expert. His 25-year career leading corporate communications departments included building one of the world’s top 10 global brands, and consultant to a national agency that launched the forerunner of the Blackberry. Jim was also a public affairs officer in the Secretary of the Air Force Office of Public Affairs, Eastern Region.

For the past decade, Jim has immersed himself in the ever-evolving world of online PR to serve clients ranging from startups to well-known publicly held corporations. Through that experience, he developed an approach that integrates the best of traditional and online public relations. Jim strongly believes that no PR professional can afford to ignore online PR or outsource it to specialists. It is an essential part of the skill set all PR professionals must have, as fundamental as writing, pitching and building relationships.

For more information on this subject, or to contact Jim Bowman, please visit http://www.theprdoc.com/.

Jim writes:

I subscribe to a number of online PR and marketing news alerts to track developments and trends. The quality is not uniformly good, and unfortunately, the feeds that consistently come up short are about small business marketing and public relations.

PR people spend considerable time debating how to charge and how to get others to appreciate them more, but few weigh in on how best to serve the needs of small businesses.

Considering the difficulty I have locating meaningful insights, I imagine small business owners find it at least equally difficult. It’s time to change that.

Make Your Image Big Online

Online PR offers small businesses a chance to look much bigger than they are, so they can compete more effectively with companies many times their own size.

If you own a small business and you’re not using any form of public relations in your marketing mix – especially online PR – you’re missing out on a great way promote your business.

I say that as a former small business owner who has done “traditional” public relations for global giants and pre-IPO start-ups. Now I help small businesses use public relations to do more business and make more money.

Public Relations Attributes

PR often is used interchangeably with publicity, but that’s a mistake. In some cases, good PR involves getting no publicity at all. Among other things, PR is:

  • Interacting with your constituencies – prospects, clients, vendors, employees, your community and the public at large – to build your brand, image and reputation;
  • Getting the benefit third-party credibility when others say good things about your products and services;
  • A long-term proposition – you must work at it consistently for months and years to get best results;

Online PR Is…

All of the above and more, using digital tools that include:

  • Keyword research;
  • Search engine optimized content – press releases, articles, videos, blog posts and informational web pages;
  • A variety of specialized websites;
  • Simultaneous outreach to prospects and customers, as well as journalists.

Public relations always has been a great way for small businesses to get known, usually at substantially less cost than advertising. The Internet magnifies and increases the effectiveness of online PR and makes it an essential tool for small businesses.

Today, small brick and mortar businesses that have flown under the radar of local newspapers are finding audiences online. PR pros who know how to serve them are doing well, as are business owners with the inclination and time to do their own public relations.

 

Thank you, Jim. I’m sure my readers have enjoyed this topic, and look forward to hearing from you again soon.

Would You Like a Beer With That Latté?

Alan Zell, author and retail marketing expert said, “Every business needs more business. That is an accepted fact. The unaccepted fact is that most businesses don’t use all the opportunities available that will bring them additional business. When one looks for additional business, the primary goal should center around getting second sales. What are second sales and why are they important? Second sales are add-on sales, repeat sales and sale by referral. They are important because they are much less expensive to get than first sales.”

I wrote about second sales, or up selling as it is more commonly referred to, last week. Today I will present two more ways to squeeze additional revenue out of your existing customer base. Allow me to begin with an actual example.

If you are a pet owner, you are aware of a powerful strategy veterinary clinics employ to drive sales and increase profits. That strategy is boarding facilities. Think about your experiences boarding pets. Chances are you also have them washed and groomed, and probably address checkups, shots and other recurring medical needs. Of the $65 average daily bill when boarding our Rottweiler, over half is for services other than boarding. I willing pay the $65 because it meets another important need. It buys the added assurance that if anything happens to my 12-year-old dog, she will be well taken care of until I return.

The point is that in addition to being profit centers in their own right, boarding facilities attract customers and generate revenue for other areas of veterinary services.

Ask yourself, “What is an equivalent up selling strategy for my business?” To be successful, it should be either complementary or counter-cyclical to your primary business. Here is an example of each strategy.

Complementary strategy: Starbucks announced a textbook example of a complementary marketing strategy in 2010. They began test marketing beer and wine sales at several Seattle locations. Designed to supplement a product line that holds diminishing customer appeal after the morning rush hour, alcohol goes on sale at 4:00 PM. Starbucks also announced their Starbucks VIA® Ready Brew coffee in 2010. It comes in four flavors, and is available online and through grocery stores and other retail channels. Not surprisingly, it was widely reported in 2011 that Starbucks has replaced Burger King as the nation’s third largest restaurant chain, a major accomplishment for a “non-burger and fries” chain.

Counter-cyclical strategy: Installing holiday lighting is big business in my town. Contractors spend most of November and early December installing lights. They spend January removing, repairing and storing lights for the summer. What do the installers do the rest of the year? I frequently see their trucks around town. I have also met several installers over the years. Everyone had a lawn maintenance or landscaping business that not coincidentally keeps them busy from March through October.

Finally, consider the capital investment (inventory, new equipment, sales training etc.) required for your new products or services, and the payback period expected before the strategy generates a positive cash flow.

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

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