CASH: NOW YOU SEE IT, NOW YOU DON’T

The first response to a cash crisis is usually to tighten up on expenses, cut back on something, or generally to make do with less. That may be necessary, but it is usually only part of the answer.

As shown in the diagram below, cash flows generated (or consumed) by any business are the net result of the inter-action of three related cycles. They are the expense, revenue and capital cycles. I will discuss the first two today, and conclude next Friday with the capital cycle.

A brief description of each follows, along with what I consider the most common problems within each cycle. All three cycles presuppose that you have the ability to measure and monitor its activities and results.

The expense cycle:

Let’s start with the expense cycle, the assumed “bad guy” for most small business cash problems. This cycle is largely what the name implies. It is also the easiest to fix.

The expense cycle involves the cash used to pay vendors, employees and others for the goods and services they supply. It also includes operating expenses such as rent and utilities.

The biggest obstacle to correcting expense cycle issues is one of attitude. Your goal is not to “pinch every penny” and second-guess past spending decisions. Experience teaches that it is too easy to miss the big picture while focusing only on inconsequential items. Reducing paper clip expenses by 80% will not save your company.

The focus of your expense cycle review should be to ensure that costs are planned and justified by their expected benefits. Ask yourself whether they are consistent with your business goals. If the answer is no, the appropriate action is to eliminate the expense. It is that simple!

Furthermore, expenses must be incurred within an environment of adequate internal controls. This control environment includes management tools such as monthly financial statements, a detailed budget and basic procedures such as a purchase order process with competitive bidding. Without these controls, it is simply not possible to manage expenses.

The revenue cycle:

The revenue cycle deals with money coming into your business. If only it were that simple!

Problems within this cycle are the most difficult to identify and analyze, especially if management lacks a solid grasp of the numbers. Consequently, the root cause of many business failures lies within the revenue cycle. They are unpleasant to address, since they ultimately affect customer relations. Two examples follow.

Money coming into a business always starts with a sale to a customer. However, it does not end there. If your business offers credit to customers, making a sale actually drains cash until you collect the receivable. This creates an inherent conflict between the desire to increase sales through generous credit terms and lenient collection procedures, and the need to maximize cash flow. Success in this area requires adequate internal controls including standardized billing and collection procedures, a balanced customer approval process, and sound treasury management.

One unpleasant aspect of squeezing more cash out of the revenue cycle is the prospect of having to raise prices. Perhaps the single most common mistake is under-pricing products and services relative to your cost structure. Correcting this challenge is even more difficult after you have established unrealistic customer pricing expectations, or if you operate in an especially competitive environment. People who do business with you primarily because you offer the lowest prices are unlikely to exhibit much customer loyalty.

We will finish this topic next Friday with a discussion of the capital cycle and a closing comment on cash flows.

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

CFO America: Your Cash Flow Optimization experts

 

Resolve To Make a Decision

Abraham Lincoln once described a general who was unwilling to make decisions under pressure as “acting like a duck that had been hit on the head.” I have never actually observed the behavior of waterfowl suffering from cranial trauma, although I once accidentally hit a duck with a stone skimmed across a frozen pond. But that was long ago and involved an entirely different part of the duck’s anatomy.

I have observed the behavior of managers making (or not making) decisions enough to conclude that the majority of problems in business are not because someone made the wrong decision, but because no one made any decision. Will Rogers summarized the risk of indecision with this, “Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit there.”

To be sure, there are “mission critical” decisions that have the long-term potential to make or break any organization. Nevertheless, unless you are a heart surgeon or an airline pilot, most mistakes are to some extent correctable, at least within limited timeframes.

Decision making is a cognitive process involving logic, reasoning and problem solving skills. Unfortunately, each of us enters the process with preconceived biases and exhibits some degree of “decision inertia” or a reluctance to move off those biases when faced with new facts or circumstances. Business decisions can be reduced to a four-step process as illustrated in the following diagram.

The first step is to analyze the problem and identify solutions. This is largely a fact gathering exercise involving input from multiple sources and considering alternative courses of action.

It is important to differentiate between problem analysis and decision making. Although it may sound redundant, success requires the decision maker to do just that, make a decision. Theodore Roosevelt said, “In any moment of decision the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing.”

While the dreaded “paralysis of analysis” may be seen as the cause, the reality is many people, perhaps including Mr. Lincoln’s general, simply find it safer not to make decisions, even in obvious situations.

As an example, I was once responsible for opening three new offices and hiring several hundred employees, including managers with company cars. The fleet manager came to me in a panic one day. Company policy allowed employees to select their own cars. This meant they would be without cars for several weeks. I calmly asked what the choices were, and immediately ordered 15 identical cars. She asked how I knew they would like the cars. The truth was I neither knew nor cared! Since a decision was needed, I made it. The managers arrived on their first day to find a fleet of new cars waiting on the front row. As expected, no one died.

Investment professionals report there is a tendency to “sell winners too quickly and hold on to losers too long.” The reason we hold on to losers is primarily a subconscious reluctance to admit mistakes. Your focus should be on early detection of challenges and the identification and implementation of appropriate corrective action. American author Arnold H. Glasow put it this way, “One of the tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency.” Be willing to make changes if indicated by the monitoring process, even at the risk of exposing your mistakes. Tony Robbins put it this way, “Stay committed to your decisions; but stay flexible in your approach.”

Accountability is paramount to a successful decision making process. If you want credit for your accomplishments, be willing to take responsibility for mistakes. Have enough confidence to say, “I was wrong, now let’s fix it.” Remember, your goal is not to avoid all mistakes. Simply doing nothing would accomplish that. Your goal is to minimize the impact of missteps and learn from them.

I end with this comment by Peter Drucker, management consultant and author of 39 books. He said, “Whenever you see a successful business, someone once made a courageous decision.”

P.S. My apologies to PETA for the whole duck by the frozen pond rock skimming long time ago hit in the anatomy thing.

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

Reducing Fear and Uncertainty, Part 2

On Monday, I introduced the topic of reducing consumer fear and uncertainty, and the distrust that often accompanies those emotions. I suggested that building a reputation for post-sale customer service and offering free samples might help overcome these marketing obstacles.

Today I will discuss offering satisfaction guarantees.

3. A self-described marketing expert once insisted I needed to offer a “100% money-back guarantee” to win new clients. It gets worse! He also suggested I guarantee savings of at least 10 times my fee. I had two major issues with the suggestion. First, in a profession where it was actually illegal to advertise only a few years ago, it sounded too much like an old-fashioned “snake oil” marketing approach. Secondly, all I do is counsel and advise clients. The value of that advice is ultimately dependent on their success in implementing recommendations in a timely fashion. I cannot guarantee the actions of others. Neither can you!

With that said, the concept of a money-back or satisfaction guarantee might have value to service providers within some narrowly defined parameters. Carefully consider the following matters:

  • At the risk of sounding like a cynic, get paid up front. Clients will be less likely to take advantage of your guarantee if they have to look you in the eye and lie about their dissatisfaction while asking for a refund.
  • Place clear and reasonable boundaries on what customers must do to qualify for a refund. Assume for example that I promise to develop your website and have it running within 60 days. That commitment must be contingent upon you providing a list of items like graphics and content, and on your timely approval of my work at various stages of completion. If your failure to perform those obligations is the primary cause of me missing the deadline, forget the money-back guarantee.
  • Consider offering a money-back guarantee on only part of your services. For example, weight loss centers advertise you will lose 20 pounds in 10 weeks for $20, or you get your money back. Since these centers cannot guarantee customers will follow the program, they cannot guarantee anyone will lose weight. They do not seem to fret much over that minor annoyance. Part of the weight loss program is that you eat their food for the entire 10 weeks. That will cost another $75 or more a week. No one can reasonably expect a refund for food they consumed, no matter how little weight was lost. Furthermore, some customers will simply be too embarrassed to admit their failure and ask for a refund. More importantly, for every customer who has their $20 fee returned, others will be so pleased with the initial results they will decide to lose 50 pounds. The extra 30 pounds are not at $1 per pound, and you still buy food from the center. This money-back guarantee is pure marketing genius.
  • Be aware that guarantees sometimes carry negative marketing connotations that can reflect poorly on your brand. That is largely due to all-too-common marketing promotions that border on deceptive advertising. I once had a client who previously developed a product marketed exclusively on late-night infomercials. You are no doubt familiar with the type of promotions to which I am referring. Everything is a huge value (whatever that is), yours for only $19.95 plus shipping and handling charges. The product always comes with a satisfaction guarantee. My client explained the rules of the game. The key phrase is “plus shipping and handling,” a greatly inflated sum that includes the actual cost of the product. That explains why infomercials frequently offer a second item “free” if customers pay separate shipping and handling fees. The $19.95 is pure gross profit! If a disgruntled consumer wants a refund, they must first return the product at their expense. The shipping and handling is not refunded. Therefore, the seller’s “worst-case scenario” is that the customer paid the full cost of the product and is now allowing them to resell it. Meanwhile, the refunded $19.95 was an interest free loan. I trust this deceptive practice is incompatible with your mission statement and value system. Do not risk long-term customer relations and reputation for the sake of short-term gains.

I will conclude this series with a discussion of introductory offers and giving free service. I look forward to meeting you here bright and early Friday morning.

What to do When Life Hands You Lemmings

Apple introduced the Macintosh personal computer in a third quarter television commercial during Super Bowl XLIII in January 1984. Playing off a George Orwell 1984 theme, it featured rows of uniformed, colorless drones. They sat mesmerized, watching as Big Brother dribbled propaganda on a large movie screen. Suddenly, a female runner chased by storm troopers entered the room. She hurled a sledgehammer against the screen, which explodes. The commercial ended with the statement, “You’ll see why 1984 won’t be like 1984.”

That commercial has been voted the best Super Bowl commercial of all time. Always stick with what works, right?

The following year, Apple decided to use Super Bowl XIX to introduce Macintosh Office. This commercial featured a long line of blindfolded business people marching across a dusty, forbidding terrain. Their only source of guidance is their hand on the shoulder of the person in front of them. One-by-one, they walk off a cliff. It has been dubbed the “Lemmings commercial” and is widely considered the worse commercial in Super Bowl history. Apple did not advertise during the Super Bowl for the next 14 years.

Have you ever had a Lemmings-like marketing experience, one whose cost was exceeded only by its complete failure to accomplish its intended purpose? Sadly, I have! I spent $10,000 developing a traditional website in the hope it would soon have my phone “ringing off the hook” with eager prospects. The vendor guaranteed a “top 3” ranking for the phrase “fractional CFO.” While it accomplished that goal, I am still waiting for the phone to ring! Very few people search that phrase, largely because they do not know what it means.

I gained three things from my personal Lemmings experience. Allow me to now swallow my pride and share the lessons learned.

1. Cut your losses!

Ego has no place in rational business decisions. Admit your mistakes, save what is left of your limited marketing budget and move on! I compounded my mistake by continuing to pay the vendor $60 a month to host the site. They provided no marketing support, no analytical data or anything to justify an additional fee. I eventually moved the site to JustHost.com, a vendor that for a low annual fee provides unlimited email and website hosting. Since I already had an account, I saved $720 per year.

2. Reevaluate your marketing goals and the tactics to achieve them.

My initial hope (it was far too naive to qualify as a goal) was that if I simply created a website, my target market would flock to it and contact me. I now realize it is unlikely businesses will retain executive management consultants solely from online relationships. That is not to say that the website cannot serve a valuable role in my marketing strategy. However, it cannot serve as the primary strategy for new business production. One of my goals is now to move promising online relationships offline. In other words, to make personal connections over a cup of coffee or phone calls. I also learned the need to help educate the business community on the existence, purpose and value of fractional CFOs. My tactics include extensive networking and event-based marketing.

3. Salvage some value from your missteps.

I grew up playing in my family’s auto recycling business (o.k., junkyard if my brother is reading this). I learned the importance of salvaging maximum value from every opportunity. In the case of my misspent marketing funds, I have uploaded the site’s video (half of its cost) to YouTube, where it may increase my Internet footprint and contribute toward my goal of consumer education. As previously mentioned, I also transferred the website to another hosting service. While this may or may not help increase brand awareness and establish my expertise, it is now essentially free!

Let me close with some simple but very practical advice. To err is human. To learn from your mistakes is good business!

© 2011 by Dale R. Schmeltzle

Generating Repeat Sales-Part 2

I introduced Monday’s post on generating repeat sales with a quote by William Edwards Deming. He said, “Profit in business comes from repeat customers, customers that boast about your project or service, and that bring friends with them.” A slight variation of that important principle is to harvest sales out of customers who have moved, even if they moved outside of your service area. Allow me to explain.

America has been a country on the move ever since it was founded by people who all crossed at least one ocean to get here. The U.S. Census Bureau reports that the national mover rate was 12.5% in 2009. According
to their Geographical Mobility: 2009 study, 37.1 million people changed residences in the U.S. that year. Of those, 67.3% stayed within the same county, 17.2% moved to a different county in the same state, 12.6% moved to a different state, and 2.9% moved to the U.S. from abroad.

Furthermore, the National Association of Realtors reported in January 2011 that the previous month’s existing home sales (including single-family, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops) was a seasonally adjusted
annual rate of 5.9 million. Experts tell us that the demographics of people moving, buying and selling houses are heavily influenced by age, occupation and income levels. The young, professionals and high-income earners are among the most likely candidates.

These statistics are troubling if you provide landscaping, pest control, cleaning, HVAC maintenance or a host of other home-based, recurring services. It does not require much data extrapolation to see that if you lose 10% or 12% of your customers every year to moves (possibly more if your market is concentrated in young, high-income professionals) you will soon be in big trouble. Even if you are able to replace customers who
migrate outside of your service area, consulting firm Lee Resources International, Inc. reports that attracting a new customer costs five times as much as keeping an existing one.

Here are some thoughts and suggestions to generate continued sales from your mobile customers.

  • Offer movers a meaningful incentive to transfer your services to their new home. A free month, a 10% discount on your standard rates or a similar promotion will prove cheaper and have a higher success rate in
    maintaining your customer base than finding new customers.
  • The mirror image of this idea is to offer customers who are moving an incentive to provide a referral to the new homeowner. However, several potential issues make it less likely to generate sales. First, it usually does not apply to customers living in non-owner occupied homes such as apartment complexes. Furthermore, assuming their home has already sold (a significant assumption in the current real estate market), your old customers probably do not know the new owners. Furthermore, homeowners will not be motivated by additional discounts off your services if they are moving out of the area. Offer the original homeowner a gift card from a national restaurant chain or retailer if the new homeowner becomes your customer because of their referral.
  • Alternatively, send the new homeowner a promotional offer touting the fact that you are familiar with their home and neighborhood since you provided service for the previous owner.

Finally, Welcome Wagon’s website lists ample reasons to target new homeowners and tenants, even if you did not provide services to the previous occupant. They point out that new homeowners spend 20 times more than established residents. That includes $102 billion on move-related products. Most importantly, they have no existing buying loyalties in their new community, and are seeking information about products and services they will need.

Once again, the need to educate the consumer presents a key marketing and growth opportunity for the observant businessperson.

Becoming a Recognized Expert

There is an old axiom in marketing that a prospect does not become a customer until a vendor touches them seven times. Touches or interactions involve every tool in your marketing quiver, including face-to-face meetings and free seminars. The axiom is supported by the fact that consumers prefer to do business with people and companies they know, like and trust.

The question every business must answer is how to initiate and sustain the process without crossing the fine line of being perceived as just another pushy or (worse yet) desperate sales person. Event-based marketing can be a very effective way to start the ball rolling. It will allow you to interact with potential customers and build trust as you demonstrate your expertise. It will also encourage them to seek you out for your knowledge and expertise, and to recommend you within their circle of influence.

There are several free event-listing sites available on the Internet should you wish to open your events to the public. Most allow business promoters to coordinate announcements and listings through Facebook and Twitter. Some allow you to issue tickets, limit attendance, collect fees (via PayPal) and even ask qualifying questions. Online event-listing websites include:

  • EventBrite
  • EventSync
  • Facebook Events
  • PlanCast
  • Zvents

Prospective attendees will ask themselves a very selfish question. What is in this for me? Most small businesses will welcome free advice in at least three areas: how to increase sales, how to reduce costs and how to generate more cash. Whatever your subject matter, promotional material must identify specific customer problems and promise real solutions.

Make sure information presented at the event closely matches those promotional promises. They are what drew attendees. It is unlikely that disappointed prospects, frustrated at not hearing the promised solutions, will become your customer.

The main point of your presentation is what the audience wants to hear, not what you want to tell them. Get to it quickly.

You want your audiences’ undivided attention. Therefore, present only a cryptic outline on slides and handouts at the event. Otherwise, attendees could have read the presentation at home and saved the trip.

Attendees will expect a commercial. Hold it for the last or next to last slide.

Finally, a drawing for a free gift certificate, an autographed copy of your latest book or some other valuable prize will encourage attendees to stay for the entire presentation.

Showing Appreciation Without Spending Money

John Willard Marriott, the late founder of the hospitality chain that bears his name, summarized the ultimate reason why every business must energize their work force. He said, “Motivate them, train them, care about them, and make winners out of them. They’ll treat the customers right. And if customers are treated right, they’ll come back.” Given Marriott International’s $11.7 billion of revenue and 34% return on equity in 2010, I must assume Marriott employees are still treating customers right, 25 years after his passing.

One of the traditional motivational tools employers use is an employee benefits package. Unfortunately, it is a sad fact that most businesses cannot afford to compensate valuable employees as much as they would like to. Providing a competitive benefits package is even more difficult for small and mid-sized businesses. In a challenging economy, many do well just to be able to offer continued employment. I previously wrote about the value of offering discounts to employees. This is especially applicable in retail businesses that sell consumer products like clothing and jewelry.

Here is a variation of that idea that may help employers in your area while generating significant sales for you. Offer discounts or special services to someone else’s employees. I once worked for a 400-employee company that arranged (at my suggestion) a pickup and delivery service by a local dry cleaner. Another employer provided a weekly car cleaning service. Since employees paid for either service as they used them, both examples created a cost-free benefit from the employers’ perspective. The services created value since they allowed employees to complete personal errands they would otherwise have to address on their own time. More to the point, these examples also presented a large one-stop customer base for the service providers.

This strategy may work especially well as a means of extending a business-to-business relationship to your customers’ employees. For example, if you repair their employer’s computers, employees will already be familiar with your service and reputation. Offer them a discount for home computer service, especially if they can save you a trip by bringing personal computers to work.

Finally, if you have employees (almost 80% of American businesses do not), try to arrange similar on-site services and discounts from businesses used by your workforce.

Nine Things I learned about YouTube-Part 2

Wednesday’s blog post discussed the first four things I learned about creating YouTube videos. It covered hardware and software requirements, and their cost. I hope you were as surprised as I was to learn you don’t have to spend a lot of money, and may already have everything you need.

Today, I will complete the list. Here are items 5 through 9:

5. Windows Live Movie maker or WLMM allows you to import entire PowerPoint presentations or individual slides. This is useful if your video subject matter is technical and requires visual aids. It is far more professional than writing on a flipchart with your back to the camera. The trick is to save documents as png or tif files, rather than in PowerPoint. The software also imports pictures. You can then narrate off-screen, or just use them to spice up your video.

6. Whether you import videos, slides or pictures, MLMM presents a plethora of editing options. I found the ability to end videos before that awkward moment when I walk off-screen to stop the camera is especially helpful. For that reason, stand motionless and silent for one or two seconds before you end a video or slide. It will make for a cleaner break as you transition into the next slide. The standard length of a slide will be 7 seconds, but that is easily changed to accommodate your need. There are also countless video and animation special effects, which I have yet to explore. One feature that I do plan to incorporate into my next video is captions. I might, as an example, include my web address or contact information in the presentation.

7. You can record narrations with Sound Recorder, and match them with the appropriate slide. If you are a type-A person as I am, concentrate on speaking at a moderate pace. Again, you can edit the duration, adjust the volume and fade in and out of the audio. You can also import music.

8. One feature of WLMM did surprise and disappoint me. Perhaps I missed something, but my computer saved the videos into something called a wlmp file format. YouTube supports a wide variety of formats, but wlmp is not among them. After a little research and experimentation, I discovered some good news. You can upload directly from WLMM to YouTube by simply clicking the appropriate “Share Button” in the upper right Toolbar. I found a technical explanation of why this works, but who cares? Problem solved!

9. Finally, once you have successfully uploaded your finished video, keep in mind that YouTube allows you to do some basic Search Engine Optimization or SEO. It allows a description and tags. As always, make them keyword rich. Fred Campos, the founder of FunCitySocialMedia, suggests you include your company’s name in video titles. Since the end game is to have people locate and watch you videos, do not over-look this important step.

Well, that’s my list. I hope you will find something of use here, and more importantly that it will encourage you to pursue more of the low-cost marketing experimentation I talked so much about in my book. If you would like to see CFO America ShiningStar Studio’s (a wholly owned subsidiary of just plain old CFO America) premiere video, please visit http://bit.ly/lx8ard.

Have a great weekend, and thanks to all the faithful readers who have so kindly posted comments and words of encouragement on this blog. Please continue to spread the word!

Web-based Sales Platforms – Part 4

For the past week, I have been discussing online “deal of the day” companies. These venues are primarily for selling products. However, numerous local, state, and nationally targeted websites allow you to promote your services or locate potential clients at little or no cost. Some will subject you to international competition, and several have experienced their share of criticism and controversy. Terms and conditions vary; shop around and investigate to find websites appropriate for your business.

New websites pop up regularly. Here are a few to get you started.

·      Elance.com provides an online marketplace for consultants and others to search for assignments, submit bids and negotiate contracts. The largest categories are information technology and marketing, including web development, programming and search engine optimization. Elance assesses their fee on payments by businesses to consultants.

·      Craigslist is a centralized network of online communities featuring free classified advertisements with sections devoted to sale items and services. According to the Factsheet on their website, Craigslist operates through 700 local websites in 70 countries. It claims 50 million users in the U.S. alone. Craigslist experiences over 20 billion page views per month, making it the seventh largest site worldwide for English language page views.

·      Fiverr.com offers products and services for $5, of which the website keeps $1. Its challenges and limitations are immediately apparent, starting with whether you want to offer anything for five bucks! You will be surprised at the offerings. Two actual examples are, “I will teach you how to make your hands a flute for $5” and “I will take a photo of myself holding a logo of any website, company, etc. for $5.” Therefore, you should carefully consider whether being in the same crowd would cheapen your brand. For that reason alone, it may not be appropriate. However, if you are willing to offer virtually free products or services to gain new customers, it merits consideration.

·      OLX hosts free user-generated classified ads for urban communities around the world and provides discussion forums for various topics. It gained prominence upon announcing a partnership with Friendster, a social networking website.

·      Guru.com is also a freelance marketplace that allows companies to find consultants for contract work in 220 different fields. Guru’s website reports over 1 million registered members and over 8,000 projects posted per month. Be aware that if the service you are marketing can be delivered remotely, competition from English-speaking competitors in developing countries in Asia and elsewhere will likely exert strong downward pressure on your price expectations. That is why I no longer advertise on Guru.com.

I will complete this series on web-based sales platforms on Monday with a discussion of several online business directory listings that are available free of charge and can be set up within minutes.

Internet Marketing for Small Business-Part 5

On Monday, I introduced the topic of email as a low-cost marketing tool. Here are a few final points that apply to your evaluation and implementation of both email marketing and survey campaigns:

You will be surprised how few people open your email. ConstantContact tracks “open rates” by about 30 industry categories. Marketing and PR firms (who should be able to achieve stellar results) are 13%. The highest category is only 27%. It is a numbers game, so do not get discouraged. Above all, do not confuse activity with results in your accountability evaluation. A 100% open rate is worthless unless it generates sales, develops new leads or gathers useful marketing data.

Two other valuable statistics are your bounce rate (percentage of undeliverable emails) and your clickthrough rate (percentage of recipients who visit your website from the email link). The first shows how current and accurate your email lists are. The second provides a measure of the effectiveness of your online campaign. Compare both rates to industry averages as published by ConstantContact or one of the other vendors.

Consider the typical schedule and workload of your intended audience. Emails and surveys sent to accountants on April 14 or to retailers the week before Christmas are not going to achieve acceptable response rates.

Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.” Apply his philosophy by scheduling mailings on different days of the week and different times of the day. Never schedule a mailing immediately before or after a holiday. It will be deleted in the rush to leave early or buried in an avalanche of emails that piled up over the long weekend.

Also, experiment with the frequency of distributions. Depending on how you use email, you may decide to do weekly or monthly mailings. Get into a regular routine. Victoria’s Secret sends daily emails. My wife finds this excessive, presumptuous and annoying. I might be forced to unsubscribe if they do not slow down. Then again, maybe not. It is all about content.

Many recipients make snap decisions whether to open or delete an email based solely on its subject line. Choose something inviting that suggests a reason to read it. Titles in the form of questions, “how to” advice or lists (for example, Five Ways to Increase Your Sales) are usually effective.

Finally, always have someone proofread every communication before issuing it.

Have a great Easter weekend, I will be right here on Monday with a new topic to help you achieve Highly Visible Marketing. Best wishes until then.

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